Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291507
Title:
Diet and observer bias in scat analysis of gray wolves
Author:
Spaulding, Raymond Leon
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
I analyzed 1,182 gray wolf (Canis lupus) scats, representing summer diet in 1988-1990, collected from 9 packs in northwest Alaska. Using a linear regression model, I determined the biomass of prey species consumed using relative estimated bulk and frequency of occurrence of prey types in scats. There were no significant differences (P < 0.05) between methods in percent biomass of prey consumed and ranking of prey types. Caribou (Rangifer tarandus), moose (Alces alces), microtines, and birds composed 47.0, 21.9, 10.6, and 13.8%, of prey items, respectively. Ungulates composed 90.1%, birds 6.7%, and microtines 0.5% of biomass consumed. Ungulates composed 3.4%, birds 50.4%, and microtines 38.5% of numbers of individuals consumed. Significant (P < 0.05) observer bias was found in the detection and frequency of prey types in the analysis of 1,052 scats by multiple observers.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Ecology.; Agriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Krausman, Paul R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDiet and observer bias in scat analysis of gray wolvesen_US
dc.creatorSpaulding, Raymond Leonen_US
dc.contributor.authorSpaulding, Raymond Leonen_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractI analyzed 1,182 gray wolf (Canis lupus) scats, representing summer diet in 1988-1990, collected from 9 packs in northwest Alaska. Using a linear regression model, I determined the biomass of prey species consumed using relative estimated bulk and frequency of occurrence of prey types in scats. There were no significant differences (P < 0.05) between methods in percent biomass of prey consumed and ranking of prey types. Caribou (Rangifer tarandus), moose (Alces alces), microtines, and birds composed 47.0, 21.9, 10.6, and 13.8%, of prey items, respectively. Ungulates composed 90.1%, birds 6.7%, and microtines 0.5% of biomass consumed. Ungulates composed 3.4%, birds 50.4%, and microtines 38.5% of numbers of individuals consumed. Significant (P < 0.05) observer bias was found in the detection and frequency of prey types in the analysis of 1,052 scats by multiple observers.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Ecology.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Forestry and Wildlife.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKrausman, Paul R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1383567en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3458240xen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.