Foreign images: A content analysis of international coverage in American television network news

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291506
Title:
Foreign images: A content analysis of international coverage in American television network news
Author:
Meyer, Cordula, 1971-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
How does television news present the world to American viewers? This study employs a content analysis of selected international news stories reported by the four major American networks between October and December 1995 to answer this question. International news has been the target of much critique, which this study puts to an empirical test. Specifically, claims about unfairly negative coverage of the Third World were supported, but not in the entirety in which they are often voiced. Coverage of international events is primarily crisis-oriented and secondarily politics-oriented and focuses on events with American involvement. The prevalence of episodic international coverage and the corresponding lack of stories conveying substantive information makes television a less than ideal source to learn about the "big picture" in global events. Methodologically, this study uses new, more precise measuring techniques, including the often omitted visual analysis of newscasts and the concept of unifying story themes.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Journalism.; Mass Communications.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kenski, Henry C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleForeign images: A content analysis of international coverage in American television network newsen_US
dc.creatorMeyer, Cordula, 1971-en_US
dc.contributor.authorMeyer, Cordula, 1971-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractHow does television news present the world to American viewers? This study employs a content analysis of selected international news stories reported by the four major American networks between October and December 1995 to answer this question. International news has been the target of much critique, which this study puts to an empirical test. Specifically, claims about unfairly negative coverage of the Third World were supported, but not in the entirety in which they are often voiced. Coverage of international events is primarily crisis-oriented and secondarily politics-oriented and focuses on events with American involvement. The prevalence of episodic international coverage and the corresponding lack of stories conveying substantive information makes television a less than ideal source to learn about the "big picture" in global events. Methodologically, this study uses new, more precise measuring techniques, including the often omitted visual analysis of newscasts and the concept of unifying story themes.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectJournalism.en_US
dc.subjectMass Communications.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKenski, Henry C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1383558en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34504345en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.