The evolution of the flower children and their respect for Native American people

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291504
Title:
The evolution of the flower children and their respect for Native American people
Author:
Lee, Michelle Idette, 1970-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Herein find a deeper look at hippie culture from the anthropological perspective, but still as observations from one deeply involved in that culture. Most of what has been written about the hippie culture has been written with an upturned nose, seemingly full of distaste. Many Native American academics share this distaste, although a true picture of hippie culture has never been offered. Leonard Wolf's Voices of the Love Generation is, perhaps, a singular exception, as his book of interviews gives voice directly to the flower children. The spiritual ties represent the most notable bonds of this community. Hippies believe all life is connected, and carry this philosophy into all aspects of ceremony. Thus, the wisdom of all peoples is essential, not merely relevant; Native American wisdom particularly important because contemporary Native Americans know more about the earth we tread here than anyone else alive can know.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
American Studies.; Anthropology, Cultural.; History, United States.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Locust, Carol; Fox, Mary Jo

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe evolution of the flower children and their respect for Native American peopleen_US
dc.creatorLee, Michelle Idette, 1970-en_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, Michelle Idette, 1970-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractHerein find a deeper look at hippie culture from the anthropological perspective, but still as observations from one deeply involved in that culture. Most of what has been written about the hippie culture has been written with an upturned nose, seemingly full of distaste. Many Native American academics share this distaste, although a true picture of hippie culture has never been offered. Leonard Wolf's Voices of the Love Generation is, perhaps, a singular exception, as his book of interviews gives voice directly to the flower children. The spiritual ties represent the most notable bonds of this community. Hippies believe all life is connected, and carry this philosophy into all aspects of ceremony. Thus, the wisdom of all peoples is essential, not merely relevant; Native American wisdom particularly important because contemporary Native Americans know more about the earth we tread here than anyone else alive can know.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAmerican Studies.en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, United States.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLocust, Carolen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFox, Mary Joen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1387963en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3826836xen_US
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