The Arab Gulf: Indicators of economic dependence on migrant communities

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291485
Title:
The Arab Gulf: Indicators of economic dependence on migrant communities
Author:
Peterson, Diane Michelle, 1960-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Following the 1973 rise in the price of oil, the six Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) nations of the Middle East became hosts to hundreds of thousands of foreign workers taking part in the economic development of the region. From the beginning, the employment of migrant workers was seen as a temporary measure, necessary to compensate for the small indigenous populations in the Gulf. The numbers of foreign workers has become so great, that the migrants now constitute a majority of the population in several of the GCC countries. The relative permanence with which foreign workers have now established themselves is of great concern to the host governments. It appears that the insufficient skill-levels and sizes of the national workforces, together with the position the extensive and growing migrant communities hold in the growing Gulf economies point to the continued presence of large foreign populations for some time to come.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Foreign workers -- Kuwait.; Foreign workers -- Saudi Arabia.; Persian Gulf Region -- Emigration and immigration.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Oriental Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bonine, Michael E.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe Arab Gulf: Indicators of economic dependence on migrant communitiesen_US
dc.creatorPeterson, Diane Michelle, 1960-en_US
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, Diane Michelle, 1960-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFollowing the 1973 rise in the price of oil, the six Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) nations of the Middle East became hosts to hundreds of thousands of foreign workers taking part in the economic development of the region. From the beginning, the employment of migrant workers was seen as a temporary measure, necessary to compensate for the small indigenous populations in the Gulf. The numbers of foreign workers has become so great, that the migrants now constitute a majority of the population in several of the GCC countries. The relative permanence with which foreign workers have now established themselves is of great concern to the host governments. It appears that the insufficient skill-levels and sizes of the national workforces, together with the position the extensive and growing migrant communities hold in the growing Gulf economies point to the continued presence of large foreign populations for some time to come.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectForeign workers -- Kuwait.en_US
dc.subjectForeign workers -- Saudi Arabia.en_US
dc.subjectPersian Gulf Region -- Emigration and immigration.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOriental Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBonine, Michael E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1339673en_US
dc.identifier.oclc22881927en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17518118en_US
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