Modality effects in children's story inference: Is a picture really worth a thousand words?

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291483
Title:
Modality effects in children's story inference: Is a picture really worth a thousand words?
Author:
Lapointe, Madeleine, 1941-
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
First, this study investigated whether the modality in which stories are presented to children affects their reasoning ability. Secondly, it inquired if children process spatial, causal, or consequential stories differently. It compared children's verbatim memory with their ability to draw inferences for three types of stories. Each child was presented with the stories either in pictures, in words, or in a combination of pictures and words. The results show that supporting a verbal presentation with images significantly increases understanding of causal and consequential stories. But, for all types of stories, all children drew significantly more correct inferences when the narrative sequences were presented to them verbally than when they were presented in pictures. Also, the results show that children perform differently on spatial stories than they do linear stories.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Elementary.; Education, Educational Psychology.; Education, Reading.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Brainerd, C. J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleModality effects in children's story inference: Is a picture really worth a thousand words?en_US
dc.creatorLapointe, Madeleine, 1941-en_US
dc.contributor.authorLapointe, Madeleine, 1941-en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractFirst, this study investigated whether the modality in which stories are presented to children affects their reasoning ability. Secondly, it inquired if children process spatial, causal, or consequential stories differently. It compared children's verbatim memory with their ability to draw inferences for three types of stories. Each child was presented with the stories either in pictures, in words, or in a combination of pictures and words. The results show that supporting a verbal presentation with images significantly increases understanding of causal and consequential stories. But, for all types of stories, all children drew significantly more correct inferences when the narrative sequences were presented to them verbally than when they were presented in pictures. Also, the results show that children perform differently on spatial stories than they do linear stories.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Elementary.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Reading.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBrainerd, C. J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1346726en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27253375en_US
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