Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291475
Title:
Exergy analysis of a pilot milk processing system
Author:
Fang, Zigang, 1958-
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Exergy analysis is applied in the thesis research to evaluate the energy usage of a pilot scale milk processing system. Using water as made-up fluid milk, the performance of separate components of the system was examined during steady state operation using both exergy and energy principles. The irreversibility distribution among these components was obtained to show the impact of energy degradation in each component on the overall system thermal performance. The difference between energy and exergy methods is discussed through comparisons of First and Second Law efficiencies to demonstrate the importance of exergy analysis. A mathematical programming model was constructed in terms of the exergy concept and solved numerically in an attempt to find a set of optimal operating state variables (temperatures and flow rates) under which irreversibility of the entire system is theoretically minimized. Finally, suggestions for operational management of the system and its components are presented which could increase the efficiency of energy usage in the system, thus reducing energy costs.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Agriculture, Food Science and Technology.; Engineering, Agricultural.; Engineering, Mechanical.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Larson, Dennis L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleExergy analysis of a pilot milk processing systemen_US
dc.creatorFang, Zigang, 1958-en_US
dc.contributor.authorFang, Zigang, 1958-en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractExergy analysis is applied in the thesis research to evaluate the energy usage of a pilot scale milk processing system. Using water as made-up fluid milk, the performance of separate components of the system was examined during steady state operation using both exergy and energy principles. The irreversibility distribution among these components was obtained to show the impact of energy degradation in each component on the overall system thermal performance. The difference between energy and exergy methods is discussed through comparisons of First and Second Law efficiencies to demonstrate the importance of exergy analysis. A mathematical programming model was constructed in terms of the exergy concept and solved numerically in an attempt to find a set of optimal operating state variables (temperatures and flow rates) under which irreversibility of the entire system is theoretically minimized. Finally, suggestions for operational management of the system and its components are presented which could increase the efficiency of energy usage in the system, thus reducing energy costs.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture, Food Science and Technology.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Agricultural.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Mechanical.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAgricultural and Biosystems Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorLarson, Dennis L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1346732en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b2727827xen_US
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