AIDS and the perception of risk in college women: An inquiry into the effectiveness of AIDS education

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291448
Title:
AIDS and the perception of risk in college women: An inquiry into the effectiveness of AIDS education
Author:
Freitas, Halley Helene Eisner, 1962-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Current AIDS information surveys are designed to evaluate an individual's degree of AIDS-related knowledge. These surveys are conducted in a forced-choice Likert format. Because rates of sexually transmitted diseases are increasing, (and by inference, therefore, so is AIDS), the author contends that testing "knowledge" is an inaccurate method in assessing sexual behavior. This study, which involves two-hour long, open-ended interviews with twenty-five college women, displays that their level of AIDS knowledge has little bearing on their sexual activity. Rather, peer group norms and values of sexual exchange influenced their sexual decision-making process. The women utilized several "voices" when discussing feelings of sexuality to negotiate coexisting dominant cultural ideals. This study explores student's sense of personal vulnerability, blame, responsibility and perceived necessity to adopt safer sexual practices.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Cultural.; Health Sciences, Public Health.; Psychology, Personality.; Education, Health.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nichter, Mark

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAIDS and the perception of risk in college women: An inquiry into the effectiveness of AIDS educationen_US
dc.creatorFreitas, Halley Helene Eisner, 1962-en_US
dc.contributor.authorFreitas, Halley Helene Eisner, 1962-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractCurrent AIDS information surveys are designed to evaluate an individual's degree of AIDS-related knowledge. These surveys are conducted in a forced-choice Likert format. Because rates of sexually transmitted diseases are increasing, (and by inference, therefore, so is AIDS), the author contends that testing "knowledge" is an inaccurate method in assessing sexual behavior. This study, which involves two-hour long, open-ended interviews with twenty-five college women, displays that their level of AIDS knowledge has little bearing on their sexual activity. Rather, peer group norms and values of sexual exchange influenced their sexual decision-making process. The women utilized several "voices" when discussing feelings of sexuality to negotiate coexisting dominant cultural ideals. This study explores student's sense of personal vulnerability, blame, responsibility and perceived necessity to adopt safer sexual practices.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Public Health.en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Personality.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Health.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNichter, Marken_US
dc.identifier.proquest1342650en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26592277en_US
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