Health protective behavior and the elderly: Hemoccult testing for early colorectal cancer detection

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291436
Title:
Health protective behavior and the elderly: Hemoccult testing for early colorectal cancer detection
Author:
Turner, Shirley
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Colorectal cancer is second only to lung cancer as a leading cause of internal cancer death. Individuals over 65 years of age are most at risk yet least likely to engage in screening for colorectal cancer. The purpose of this descriptive-correlational study using a modified Pender Health Promotion Model was to identify motivations of elderly individuals to engage in health protective behavior. A convenience sample of 90 subjects answered a four-part motivations questionnaire in which three subscales--early detection, powerful others, and chance--met reliability standards (alpha >.70). Chance was significantly related to compliance (r = -.28; p =.003); Hemoccult compliers believed less in chance and powerful others than did non-compliers (p =.005;.002). The 88 percent who performed a Hemoccult stool test as a screening method for early detection of colorectal cancer demonstrated that these elders willingly engaged in health protective behavior and supported the nurses' role in promoting primary prevention in elderly clients.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Medical screening.; Health behavior.; Colon (Anatomy) -- Cancer.; Rectum -- Cancer.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Atwood, Jan R.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleHealth protective behavior and the elderly: Hemoccult testing for early colorectal cancer detectionen_US
dc.creatorTurner, Shirleyen_US
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Shirleyen_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractColorectal cancer is second only to lung cancer as a leading cause of internal cancer death. Individuals over 65 years of age are most at risk yet least likely to engage in screening for colorectal cancer. The purpose of this descriptive-correlational study using a modified Pender Health Promotion Model was to identify motivations of elderly individuals to engage in health protective behavior. A convenience sample of 90 subjects answered a four-part motivations questionnaire in which three subscales--early detection, powerful others, and chance--met reliability standards (alpha >.70). Chance was significantly related to compliance (r = -.28; p =.003); Hemoccult compliers believed less in chance and powerful others than did non-compliers (p =.005;.002). The 88 percent who performed a Hemoccult stool test as a screening method for early detection of colorectal cancer demonstrated that these elders willingly engaged in health protective behavior and supported the nurses' role in promoting primary prevention in elderly clients.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMedical screening.en_US
dc.subjectHealth behavior.en_US
dc.subjectColon (Anatomy) -- Cancer.en_US
dc.subjectRectum -- Cancer.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAtwood, Jan R.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1337989en_US
dc.identifier.oclc23852393en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b17687767en_US
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