Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291421
Title:
Bile acid-induced DNA damage in bacteria
Author:
Zheng, Zhi-Ying, 1957-
Issue Date:
1990
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Bile acids have been implicated by epidemiologic evidence as causative agents in colon cancer. Previous studies have indicated that the bile acids damage DNA. However, the conjugated forms of bile acids (eg. tauro conjugates) have not been tested for interaction with DNA. The present study compared the DNA-damaging ability of unconjugated and conjugated bile acids using the E. coli SOS test system. The E. coli tester strain was incubated with the bile acids and conjugated bile acids. Both cell survival and induction of the SOS response was measured. Among unconjugated bile acids, deoxycholate, chenodeoxycholate, and lithocholic acid were confirmed as DNA damaging agents by a decrease in surviving fraction and increase of the fraction of blue colonies undergoing SOS induction with increasing doses. Cholate, however, did not cause DNA damage by these criteria. Among the conjugated bile acids, taurochenodeoxycholate caused as much DNA damage as chenodeoxycholate. Taurodeoxycholate caused DNA damage, but had less of an effect than deoxycholate. Taurocholate and taurolithocholate failed to show a DNA damaging effect.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Health Sciences, Nutrition.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nutrition and Food Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Bernstein, Harris

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleBile acid-induced DNA damage in bacteriaen_US
dc.creatorZheng, Zhi-Ying, 1957-en_US
dc.contributor.authorZheng, Zhi-Ying, 1957-en_US
dc.date.issued1990en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractBile acids have been implicated by epidemiologic evidence as causative agents in colon cancer. Previous studies have indicated that the bile acids damage DNA. However, the conjugated forms of bile acids (eg. tauro conjugates) have not been tested for interaction with DNA. The present study compared the DNA-damaging ability of unconjugated and conjugated bile acids using the E. coli SOS test system. The E. coli tester strain was incubated with the bile acids and conjugated bile acids. Both cell survival and induction of the SOS response was measured. Among unconjugated bile acids, deoxycholate, chenodeoxycholate, and lithocholic acid were confirmed as DNA damaging agents by a decrease in surviving fraction and increase of the fraction of blue colonies undergoing SOS induction with increasing doses. Cholate, however, did not cause DNA damage by these criteria. Among the conjugated bile acids, taurochenodeoxycholate caused as much DNA damage as chenodeoxycholate. Taurodeoxycholate caused DNA damage, but had less of an effect than deoxycholate. Taurocholate and taurolithocholate failed to show a DNA damaging effect.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Nutrition.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutrition and Food Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBernstein, Harrisen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1342010en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b26475492en_US
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