The legislation of identity: "I'll be damned if I let these people take my family's heritage away with the stroke of a pen"

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291415
Title:
The legislation of identity: "I'll be damned if I let these people take my family's heritage away with the stroke of a pen"
Author:
Meadow, Alison Maria
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Assimilation has been used as a tool by the federal government to further its colonial enterprise. Through assimilationist policies, the federal government gained land and resources from Indian people. The codification of a definition of "Indian" in the Indian Reorganization Act (IRA) was intended to limit the number of people to whom the federal government owed a unique political and financial relationship. The application of a definition of "Indian," based on blood-quantum standards, was an attempt to assimilate Indian people out of their Indian identity and into mainstream society where they are not party to the federal relationship. The legislated definition, which differs from tribes' customs and values regarding membership, has had several effects. The definition has affected tribes' abilities to be fully self-determining and issues of "membership" have created divisions within tribes and among Indian people. This paper examines the history of blood-quantum definitions and the long-term effects of and reactions to those definitions within Indian communities.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Law.; Political Science, General.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Williams, Robert A., Jr.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe legislation of identity: "I'll be damned if I let these people take my family's heritage away with the stroke of a pen"en_US
dc.creatorMeadow, Alison Mariaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMeadow, Alison Mariaen_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAssimilation has been used as a tool by the federal government to further its colonial enterprise. Through assimilationist policies, the federal government gained land and resources from Indian people. The codification of a definition of "Indian" in the Indian Reorganization Act (IRA) was intended to limit the number of people to whom the federal government owed a unique political and financial relationship. The application of a definition of "Indian," based on blood-quantum standards, was an attempt to assimilate Indian people out of their Indian identity and into mainstream society where they are not party to the federal relationship. The legislated definition, which differs from tribes' customs and values regarding membership, has had several effects. The definition has affected tribes' abilities to be fully self-determining and issues of "membership" have created divisions within tribes and among Indian people. This paper examines the history of blood-quantum definitions and the long-term effects of and reactions to those definitions within Indian communities.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLaw.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, General.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWilliams, Robert A., Jr.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1395268en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b39652166en_US
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