Furance and carbon dioxide laser densification of sol-gel derived silicon oxide-titanium oxide-aluminum oxide planar optical waveguides

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291388
Title:
Furance and carbon dioxide laser densification of sol-gel derived silicon oxide-titanium oxide-aluminum oxide planar optical waveguides
Author:
LoStracco, Gregory, 1960-
Issue Date:
1994
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
An experimental investigation on the furnace and CO₂ laser densification of sol-gel derived SiO₂-TiO₂-Al₂O₃ planar optical waveguides was performed. Solutions containing equal mole fractions of tetraethoxysiline [Si(C₂H₅O)₄], titanium ethoxide [Ti(C₂H₅O)₄], aluminum tri-sec-butoxide [Al(C₄H₉O)₃] were used to spin films with a nominal 2:2:1 molar SiO₂-TiO₂-Al₂O₃ composition. Emphasis was placed on determining what effects the densification techniques had on film shrinkage, index change, crystallization and composition. Film shrinkage and refractive index change were found to be similar for both densification techniques. Fully dense, amorphous film were obtained with both methods. After densification, further heating caused titania crystalline phases to form with both processing techniques. However, anatase formed in the furnace fired films while rutile formed in the laser irradiated films.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Physics, Optics.; Engineering, Materials Science.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Material Science and Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Fabes, Brian D.; Zelinski, Brian J. J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFurance and carbon dioxide laser densification of sol-gel derived silicon oxide-titanium oxide-aluminum oxide planar optical waveguidesen_US
dc.creatorLoStracco, Gregory, 1960-en_US
dc.contributor.authorLoStracco, Gregory, 1960-en_US
dc.date.issued1994en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAn experimental investigation on the furnace and CO₂ laser densification of sol-gel derived SiO₂-TiO₂-Al₂O₃ planar optical waveguides was performed. Solutions containing equal mole fractions of tetraethoxysiline [Si(C₂H₅O)₄], titanium ethoxide [Ti(C₂H₅O)₄], aluminum tri-sec-butoxide [Al(C₄H₉O)₃] were used to spin films with a nominal 2:2:1 molar SiO₂-TiO₂-Al₂O₃ composition. Emphasis was placed on determining what effects the densification techniques had on film shrinkage, index change, crystallization and composition. Film shrinkage and refractive index change were found to be similar for both densification techniques. Fully dense, amorphous film were obtained with both methods. After densification, further heating caused titania crystalline phases to form with both processing techniques. However, anatase formed in the furnace fired films while rutile formed in the laser irradiated films.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Optics.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Materials Science.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMaterial Science and Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFabes, Brian D.en_US
dc.contributor.advisorZelinski, Brian J. J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1358526en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b320879139en_US
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