A re-examination of Julian Hayden's Malpais model: Field notes, formation processes and the Clovis vs pre-Clovis debate

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291384
Title:
A re-examination of Julian Hayden's Malpais model: Field notes, formation processes and the Clovis vs pre-Clovis debate
Author:
Heilen, Michael Peter
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Among Julian Hayden's many substantial contributions to southwestern prehistory is what can be termed the Malpais model. Developed over the course of decades, Hayden's view of prehistory in the extreme deserts of Mexico's Sierra Pinacate region eventually upheld the Malpais model as a pre-Clovis claim. While Julian Hayden's observations and ideas engaged the interest and participation of numerous archaeologists and geologists in his Sierra Pinacate work, the complicated nature of the sites he studied has left the age and nature of Malpais sites an open question. A re-evaluation of Julian Hayden's Malpais model requires: (1) exploration of documents related to Haydens' Sierra Pinacate fieldwork and the conceptual development of the Malpais model; (2) review of current geological and archaeological studies related to the formation processes of sites located in areas of desert pavement; and (3) an examination of the Malpais model with respect to the Clovis versus pre-Clovis controversy.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Archaeology.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Reid, J. Jefferson

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA re-examination of Julian Hayden's Malpais model: Field notes, formation processes and the Clovis vs pre-Clovis debateen_US
dc.creatorHeilen, Michael Peteren_US
dc.contributor.authorHeilen, Michael Peteren_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAmong Julian Hayden's many substantial contributions to southwestern prehistory is what can be termed the Malpais model. Developed over the course of decades, Hayden's view of prehistory in the extreme deserts of Mexico's Sierra Pinacate region eventually upheld the Malpais model as a pre-Clovis claim. While Julian Hayden's observations and ideas engaged the interest and participation of numerous archaeologists and geologists in his Sierra Pinacate work, the complicated nature of the sites he studied has left the age and nature of Malpais sites an open question. A re-evaluation of Julian Hayden's Malpais model requires: (1) exploration of documents related to Haydens' Sierra Pinacate fieldwork and the conceptual development of the Malpais model; (2) review of current geological and archaeological studies related to the formation processes of sites located in areas of desert pavement; and (3) an examination of the Malpais model with respect to the Clovis versus pre-Clovis controversy.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorReid, J. Jeffersonen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1407829en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b4248182xen_US
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