Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291382
Title:
The Choctaw economy: Reciprocity in action
Author:
Kelley, Jean Margaret, 1966-
Issue Date:
1991
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Although Europeans unquestioningly impacted the indigenous economies of the Americas, these original economies have shifted, but have never entirely disappeared. Early European witnesses of these tribal systems were often off the mark in interpreting their observations, especially when the data was forced into completely European models. With the secondary sources available, a less Eurocentric model of the 18th and 19th century Choctaw economy can be constructed. This reconstruction will help develop more accurate portrayals of functions within tribal societies.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
History, United States.; Economics, History.; History, General.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; American Indian Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Williams, Robert A., Jr.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe Choctaw economy: Reciprocity in actionen_US
dc.creatorKelley, Jean Margaret, 1966-en_US
dc.contributor.authorKelley, Jean Margaret, 1966-en_US
dc.date.issued1991en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAlthough Europeans unquestioningly impacted the indigenous economies of the Americas, these original economies have shifted, but have never entirely disappeared. Early European witnesses of these tribal systems were often off the mark in interpreting their observations, especially when the data was forced into completely European models. With the secondary sources available, a less Eurocentric model of the 18th and 19th century Choctaw economy can be constructed. This reconstruction will help develop more accurate portrayals of functions within tribal societies.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHistory, United States.en_US
dc.subjectEconomics, History.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, General.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAmerican Indian Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWilliams, Robert A., Jr.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1346727en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b27253387en_US
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