Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291380
Title:
Recasting a nation: The reburial of Agustin de Iturbide
Author:
Salvato, Amy Baker
Issue Date:
1999
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Agustin de Iturbide's countrymen proclaimed him the "Hero of Iguala" for securing Mexico's independence in 1821. By 1824, he lay in a humble tomb, executed as a traitor. In October 1838, the government consummated the re-acceptance of Iturbide into the pantheon of heroes with an elaborate public reburial in the National Cathedral of Mexico City. Iturbide's reburial was less about forgiving past indiscretions than about bringing legitimacy to the current political party in power. In the mid-1830s, conservative forces regained control of the government from liberals led by Valentin Gomez Farias. Conservatives faced internal political and financial chaos, and the external threat of war in 1838. Through the ceremony, secular, ecclesiastic and military conservatives strengthened their political power and legitimacy, while reaffirming conservative national values and traditional social hierarchy. By incorporating religious and sociopolitical aspects, ceremony organizers hoped to bring order and stability to Mexico once again.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
History, Latin American.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Latin American Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Beezley, William H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleRecasting a nation: The reburial of Agustin de Iturbideen_US
dc.creatorSalvato, Amy Bakeren_US
dc.contributor.authorSalvato, Amy Bakeren_US
dc.date.issued1999en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAgustin de Iturbide's countrymen proclaimed him the "Hero of Iguala" for securing Mexico's independence in 1821. By 1824, he lay in a humble tomb, executed as a traitor. In October 1838, the government consummated the re-acceptance of Iturbide into the pantheon of heroes with an elaborate public reburial in the National Cathedral of Mexico City. Iturbide's reburial was less about forgiving past indiscretions than about bringing legitimacy to the current political party in power. In the mid-1830s, conservative forces regained control of the government from liberals led by Valentin Gomez Farias. Conservatives faced internal political and financial chaos, and the external threat of war in 1838. Through the ceremony, secular, ecclesiastic and military conservatives strengthened their political power and legitimacy, while reaffirming conservative national values and traditional social hierarchy. By incorporating religious and sociopolitical aspects, ceremony organizers hoped to bring order and stability to Mexico once again.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Latin American.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLatin American Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBeezley, William H.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1398034en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b40272266en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.