Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291378
Title:
A woman's work is never done: Changing labor at Grasshopper Pueblo
Author:
Dahlen, Sarah Paige
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
After being a dominant decorated ware in the northern Southwest for centuries, Cibola White Ware ceased to be produced in the Grasshopper region of Arizona within a single generation, sometime between A.D. 1300--1325. The demise of Cibola White Ware and the increase in locally-produced Roosevelt and Grasshopper red wares coincided with the transition to full dependence on agriculture in this region. This study draws on feminist theory, theories of technological change, and an extremely robust archaeological record to construct an explanatory model of this ceramic transition by exploring one critical feature of the context in which it occurred: the labor of Grasshopper women. The model proposes that Roosevelt and Grasshopper red ware pottery were less labor-intensive than Cibola White Ware pottery to produce and that their adoption was related to women's scheduling constraints associated with the rapid transition to agriculture.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Archaeology.; Women's Studies.
Degree Name:
M.A.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Anthropology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Reid, J. Jefferson

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA woman's work is never done: Changing labor at Grasshopper Puebloen_US
dc.creatorDahlen, Sarah Paigeen_US
dc.contributor.authorDahlen, Sarah Paigeen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAfter being a dominant decorated ware in the northern Southwest for centuries, Cibola White Ware ceased to be produced in the Grasshopper region of Arizona within a single generation, sometime between A.D. 1300--1325. The demise of Cibola White Ware and the increase in locally-produced Roosevelt and Grasshopper red wares coincided with the transition to full dependence on agriculture in this region. This study draws on feminist theory, theories of technological change, and an extremely robust archaeological record to construct an explanatory model of this ceramic transition by exploring one critical feature of the context in which it occurred: the labor of Grasshopper women. The model proposes that Roosevelt and Grasshopper red ware pottery were less labor-intensive than Cibola White Ware pottery to produce and that their adoption was related to women's scheduling constraints associated with the rapid transition to agriculture.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.A.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorReid, J. Jeffersonen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1405052en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41939190en_US
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