Development and evaluation of a dynamic phantom using four independently perfused in vitro kidneys as a tool for investigating hyperthermia systems

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291341
Title:
Development and evaluation of a dynamic phantom using four independently perfused in vitro kidneys as a tool for investigating hyperthermia systems
Author:
Zaerr, Jon Benjamin, 1963-
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A dynamic phantom for use in investigating hyperthermia heating systems has been designed, constructed, and tested. A computer controlled the flow rate of 80% Ethanol to each of 4 preserved in vitro canine kidneys which acted as the phantom material. The flow rates were regulated with stepper motor controlled valves and measured with flow meters by the computer. This provided a flexible system for adjusting the perfusion as desired. The system was tested with step and ramp changes in perfusion under constant power ultrasound and with a temperature controlled perfusion algorithm, all of which yielded repeatable results. The dynamic phantom developed in this work shows potential for expediting investigations of hyperthermia controllers, temporal blood flow patterns, and inverse problems. Its computer based nature gives it great flexibility which would lend itself well to automated testing procedures.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Heat -- Physiological effect.; Heat -- Transmission -- Equipment and supplies -- Design and construction.; Heat -- Transmission -- Mathematical models.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Roemer, Robert B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDevelopment and evaluation of a dynamic phantom using four independently perfused in vitro kidneys as a tool for investigating hyperthermia systemsen_US
dc.creatorZaerr, Jon Benjamin, 1963-en_US
dc.contributor.authorZaerr, Jon Benjamin, 1963-en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA dynamic phantom for use in investigating hyperthermia heating systems has been designed, constructed, and tested. A computer controlled the flow rate of 80% Ethanol to each of 4 preserved in vitro canine kidneys which acted as the phantom material. The flow rates were regulated with stepper motor controlled valves and measured with flow meters by the computer. This provided a flexible system for adjusting the perfusion as desired. The system was tested with step and ramp changes in perfusion under constant power ultrasound and with a temperature controlled perfusion algorithm, all of which yielded repeatable results. The dynamic phantom developed in this work shows potential for expediting investigations of hyperthermia controllers, temporal blood flow patterns, and inverse problems. Its computer based nature gives it great flexibility which would lend itself well to automated testing procedures.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHeat -- Physiological effect.en_US
dc.subjectHeat -- Transmission -- Equipment and supplies -- Design and construction.en_US
dc.subjectHeat -- Transmission -- Mathematical models.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAerospace and Mechanical Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRoemer, Robert B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1337996en_US
dc.identifier.oclc23379035en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b18421118en_US
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