Filling the void: A descriptive study of the process of attachment between elderly people and their pets

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291338
Title:
Filling the void: A descriptive study of the process of attachment between elderly people and their pets
Author:
Cookman, Craig Alan
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A descriptive study using grounded theory methodology proposed to explore the process of attachment between elders and their pet dogs. Five informants aged sixty-one to eighty-four participated in the study. Eleven interviews provided data for analysis. Data analysis revealed a process where elderly informants reported 'something missing' in their lives previous to pet ownership. Pet adoption provided 'someone' to communicate with, 'someone' to come to know and understand, and 'someone' to be with and share everyday life. Filling the Void emerged as the core concept describing these processes. Further research requires a larger sample to allow more thorough theoretical sampling and subsequent variation in the data. Implications of this research for nursing practice include the need for nurses to be alert to the possibility a pet may be functioning as an attachment figure in the life of an older adult.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Pets -- Social aspects.; Pets -- Psychological aspects.; Older people -- Psychology.; Dogs.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Nursing
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Pergrin, Jesse V.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleFilling the void: A descriptive study of the process of attachment between elderly people and their petsen_US
dc.creatorCookman, Craig Alanen_US
dc.contributor.authorCookman, Craig Alanen_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA descriptive study using grounded theory methodology proposed to explore the process of attachment between elders and their pet dogs. Five informants aged sixty-one to eighty-four participated in the study. Eleven interviews provided data for analysis. Data analysis revealed a process where elderly informants reported 'something missing' in their lives previous to pet ownership. Pet adoption provided 'someone' to communicate with, 'someone' to come to know and understand, and 'someone' to be with and share everyday life. Filling the Void emerged as the core concept describing these processes. Further research requires a larger sample to allow more thorough theoretical sampling and subsequent variation in the data. Implications of this research for nursing practice include the need for nurses to be alert to the possibility a pet may be functioning as an attachment figure in the life of an older adult.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPets -- Social aspects.en_US
dc.subjectPets -- Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectOlder people -- Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectDogs.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNursingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPergrin, Jesse V.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest1333230en_US
dc.identifier.oclc20383036en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b16990432en_US
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