'Asina nos criaron': Contesting the narratives and claiming place in the Atomic Age, 1912-1955

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291326
Title:
'Asina nos criaron': Contesting the narratives and claiming place in the Atomic Age, 1912-1955
Author:
Montoya, Yvonne Marie
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Asina nos criaron': Contesting the Narratives and Claiming Space in the Atomic Age: 1912-1955 examines how the establishment of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratories (LASL), on the Pajarito Plateau, affected ethnic Spanish-speaking residents of the adjacent Pojoaque Valley. This thesis traces the long-standing history of a rural population who resided in the Pojoaque Valley, generally considered to be vacant land prior to LASL. Although this work focuses mostly on the 1940s, it also outlines the shifts in land ownership. Additionally, this thesis traces the physical changes and cultural negotiations that allowed these long time residents to remain on their land. It is argued that the imposition of LASL's social and economic hierarchies altered the Pojoaque valley's traditional intracultural relationships, which led to the subjugation of the area's ethnic Spanish-speaking nuevomexicanos. As a result, this population resorted to altering its ethnic identity in order to combat the racism introduced and enforced by LASL.
Type:
text; Thesis-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Mexican American Studies and Reserch Center
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Mexican American Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Otero, Lydia

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.title'Asina nos criaron': Contesting the narratives and claiming place in the Atomic Age, 1912-1955en_US
dc.creatorMontoya, Yvonne Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorMontoya, Yvonne Marieen_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAsina nos criaron': Contesting the Narratives and Claiming Space in the Atomic Age: 1912-1955 examines how the establishment of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratories (LASL), on the Pajarito Plateau, affected ethnic Spanish-speaking residents of the adjacent Pojoaque Valley. This thesis traces the long-standing history of a rural population who resided in the Pojoaque Valley, generally considered to be vacant land prior to LASL. Although this work focuses mostly on the 1940s, it also outlines the shifts in land ownership. Additionally, this thesis traces the physical changes and cultural negotiations that allowed these long time residents to remain on their land. It is argued that the imposition of LASL's social and economic hierarchies altered the Pojoaque valley's traditional intracultural relationships, which led to the subjugation of the area's ethnic Spanish-speaking nuevomexicanos. As a result, this population resorted to altering its ethnic identity in order to combat the racism introduced and enforced by LASL.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectMexican American Studies and Reserch Centeren_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMexican American Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorOtero, Lydiaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest1427227en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b49001176en_US
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