Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291153
Title:
Maximizing Minimal Green Space: Re-thinking land use on Coast Guard Bases
Author:
Rasmussen, Libby
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author or the department.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture Master's Theses and Reports collections. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the UA Campus Repository at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Green space and how it is utilized on Coast Guard bases varies widely due to a lack in regulations on green space development. Creating a design and development model for green space that can be applied to all bases and yet still be customizable, will help set guidelines on this type of land use that can ultimately increase the morale and well-being of the Coast Guard members. The model will be based on small scale design that incorporates nodes of activity, creating spaces that encourage physical fitness and recreation that address Coast Guard fitness requirements, support military functions, and increase the opportunities for outdoor social gathering spaces. Inherent to the node designs will be the use of ecologically minded design that will encourage habitat creation and storm water filtrations in conjunction with the use native plants. These micro-scale designs will focus on conservative installation and maintenance costs and require smaller spaces to implement than typical larger scale solutions, yet could pay off exponentially in increased physical and positive social activity in these spaces. Once the model is created, it will be applied to the Coast Guard Base Seattle located on Pier 36, downtown Seattle, WA.
Type:
text; Electronic Report
Degree Name:
MLA
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Landscape Architecture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Stoltz, Ron

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMaximizing Minimal Green Space: Re-thinking land use on Coast Guard Basesen_US
dc.contributor.authorRasmussen, Libbyen_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author or the department.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture Master's Theses and Reports collections. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the UA Campus Repository at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.description.abstractGreen space and how it is utilized on Coast Guard bases varies widely due to a lack in regulations on green space development. Creating a design and development model for green space that can be applied to all bases and yet still be customizable, will help set guidelines on this type of land use that can ultimately increase the morale and well-being of the Coast Guard members. The model will be based on small scale design that incorporates nodes of activity, creating spaces that encourage physical fitness and recreation that address Coast Guard fitness requirements, support military functions, and increase the opportunities for outdoor social gathering spaces. Inherent to the node designs will be the use of ecologically minded design that will encourage habitat creation and storm water filtrations in conjunction with the use native plants. These micro-scale designs will focus on conservative installation and maintenance costs and require smaller spaces to implement than typical larger scale solutions, yet could pay off exponentially in increased physical and positive social activity in these spaces. Once the model is created, it will be applied to the Coast Guard Base Seattle located on Pier 36, downtown Seattle, WA.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Reporten_US
thesis.degree.nameMLAen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLandscape Architectureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairStoltz, Ronen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/291153-
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