The Effects of Adaptive Shading and the Selective Reflector Light Shelf on Office Building Energy Efficiency and Daylight Performance in Hot Arid Regions

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/291050
Title:
The Effects of Adaptive Shading and the Selective Reflector Light Shelf on Office Building Energy Efficiency and Daylight Performance in Hot Arid Regions
Author:
Abboushi, Belal Khalid
Issue Date:
2013
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author or the department.
Collection Information:
This item is part of the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture Master's Theses and Reports collections. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the UA Campus Repository at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.
Abstract:
Highly glazed facades have been increasingly built for aesthetics, to achieve green buildings ratings, and to maximize daylight admission. In general, when the window area increases, building energy consumption increases. The objective of this thesis is to provide architects and engineers with a method to increase window area, attain daylight benefits, improve indoor environmental quality, and enhance connectivity to outdoors without increasing the building energy consumption. Adaptive shading was utilized to control solar heat gain and improve daylight performance. Additionally, this research proposed a new type of light shelves, Solar Reflector Light Shelf (SRL), which helps improve daylight while reducing heat gain. COMFEN 4.1 and Energy Plus software were used to simulate different system combinations and options, and to evaluate their performance based on monthly energy consumption, illuminance, luminance, and DGI levels.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Architecture; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Chalfoun, Nader

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe Effects of Adaptive Shading and the Selective Reflector Light Shelf on Office Building Energy Efficiency and Daylight Performance in Hot Arid Regionsen_US
dc.contributor.authorAbboushi, Belal Khaliden_US
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture, and the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author or the department.en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Architecture, Planning, and Landscape Architecture Master's Theses and Reports collections. For more information about items in this collection, please contact the UA Campus Repository at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.description.abstractHighly glazed facades have been increasingly built for aesthetics, to achieve green buildings ratings, and to maximize daylight admission. In general, when the window area increases, building energy consumption increases. The objective of this thesis is to provide architects and engineers with a method to increase window area, attain daylight benefits, improve indoor environmental quality, and enhance connectivity to outdoors without increasing the building energy consumption. Adaptive shading was utilized to control solar heat gain and improve daylight performance. Additionally, this research proposed a new type of light shelves, Solar Reflector Light Shelf (SRL), which helps improve daylight while reducing heat gain. COMFEN 4.1 and Energy Plus software were used to simulate different system combinations and options, and to evaluate their performance based on monthly energy consumption, illuminance, luminance, and DGI levels.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitectureen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChalfoun, Naderen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/291050-
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.