Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290687
Title:
Once upon a time: Storying in a middle school classroom
Author:
Freedman, Lauren, 1946-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was first and foremost to investigate the storying process used by six middle school students, their teacher, the school administrator and the researcher as they moved through their classroom/school lives. Second, I sought to incorporate the storying process within the larger context of a literate, learning centered classroom community in which storying is integrated with transaction, democracy, culture, and inquiry. Third, I wanted to examine the process of storying from a critical perspective in order to suggest ways to transform educational practices from a reproductionist to a social reconstructionist approach. This interpretive ethnography included the data collection strategies of individual and group interviews and field notes. A theoretical framework for storying was developed using a modified analytic induction method. The categories were constructed and coded using a constant comparative method. The major finding of this study was that storying is a distinct participatory/dialogic process which makes use of narrative elements. This process incorporates the speech mechanisms of mini-monologue, dialogue, and multilogue. Stories are initiated when someone starts to share spontaneously or when invited by a listener. The responses of listener(s) and/or speaker(s) fall into the categories of intermittent responses, ignoring a story starter, listener's tangential comments, popcorn stories, and sustaining a story through extraneous interruptions. The four major purposes for storying are to reflect on and understand experience, to negotiate and evaluate experience, to develop and sustain relationships, and to construct and reinforce knowledge. Storying is a powerful resource which can be employed in curriculum planning and practice to build community, engage in critical thinking, and construct knowledge. Storying is also a research tool for university and teacher researchers to both gather and analyze data through examining current theory and practice so that these can be imagined and structured in new ways.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Language and Literature.; Education, Secondary.; Education, Curriculum and Instruction.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading and Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Short, Kathy G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleOnce upon a time: Storying in a middle school classroomen_US
dc.creatorFreedman, Lauren, 1946-en_US
dc.contributor.authorFreedman, Lauren, 1946-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was first and foremost to investigate the storying process used by six middle school students, their teacher, the school administrator and the researcher as they moved through their classroom/school lives. Second, I sought to incorporate the storying process within the larger context of a literate, learning centered classroom community in which storying is integrated with transaction, democracy, culture, and inquiry. Third, I wanted to examine the process of storying from a critical perspective in order to suggest ways to transform educational practices from a reproductionist to a social reconstructionist approach. This interpretive ethnography included the data collection strategies of individual and group interviews and field notes. A theoretical framework for storying was developed using a modified analytic induction method. The categories were constructed and coded using a constant comparative method. The major finding of this study was that storying is a distinct participatory/dialogic process which makes use of narrative elements. This process incorporates the speech mechanisms of mini-monologue, dialogue, and multilogue. Stories are initiated when someone starts to share spontaneously or when invited by a listener. The responses of listener(s) and/or speaker(s) fall into the categories of intermittent responses, ignoring a story starter, listener's tangential comments, popcorn stories, and sustaining a story through extraneous interruptions. The four major purposes for storying are to reflect on and understand experience, to negotiate and evaluate experience, to develop and sustain relationships, and to construct and reinforce knowledge. Storying is a powerful resource which can be employed in curriculum planning and practice to build community, engage in critical thinking, and construct knowledge. Storying is also a research tool for university and teacher researchers to both gather and analyze data through examining current theory and practice so that these can be imagined and structured in new ways.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Language and Literature.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Secondary.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Curriculum and Instruction.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorShort, Kathy G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9720657en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3457198xen_US
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