The effect of one child's chronic illness on two children in the same family: A within-family investigation of sibling relationships and social/emotional adjustment

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290669
Title:
The effect of one child's chronic illness on two children in the same family: A within-family investigation of sibling relationships and social/emotional adjustment
Author:
Holmquist, Emily Jeanne Woulbroun, 1965-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
One hundred twenty-two mothers, 89 children with chronic illnesses, and 56 of their brothers and sisters participated in a study designed to elucidate the processes by which one child's chronic illness affects two children in the same family. The investigation was guided by assumptions of a phenomenological approach, behavioral geneticists' findings on nonshared environment and by Lazarus' and Folkman's (1984) transactional perspective on stress and coping. This study had four purposes. The first was to describe and compare three different levels of influence on children's developmental context: individual child characteristics, dyadic influences, and family level influences. The individual characteristic was each child's illness appraisals, while dyadic and family level influences were represented by sibling relationship quality and maternal differential treatment, respectively. The second goal was to examine the direct associations among these influences and social emotional adjustment. The third aim was to examine the effect of illness burden and maternal differential treatment on each child's perceptions of sibling relationship quality. The final goal was to examine the influence of these two variables and sibling relationship quality on each child's social-emotional adjustment. Families were recruited through a clinic in Southern Arizona by mail and were sent questionnaires to complete if they expressed interest. For the present study, mothers provided demographic information, and information on objective illness burdens and each child's behavioral adjustment. Children provided illness appraisals and information about their sibling relationships and social emotional adjustment. Children's illness appraisals, perceptions of sibling relationship quality, maternal differential treatment, and social emotional adjustment were remarkably similar to each other. Maternal differential treatment, illness appraisals, and objective illness burdens accounted for significant portions of the variance in siblings' perceptions of sibling relationship quality, but not in the perceptions of children with illnesses. A significant regression equation for social emotional adjustment was obtained for siblings. A significant beta weight indicated that conflict was associated with more negative outcomes.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Developmental.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Family and Consumer Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gamble, Wendy C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe effect of one child's chronic illness on two children in the same family: A within-family investigation of sibling relationships and social/emotional adjustmenten_US
dc.creatorHolmquist, Emily Jeanne Woulbroun, 1965-en_US
dc.contributor.authorHolmquist, Emily Jeanne Woulbroun, 1965-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOne hundred twenty-two mothers, 89 children with chronic illnesses, and 56 of their brothers and sisters participated in a study designed to elucidate the processes by which one child's chronic illness affects two children in the same family. The investigation was guided by assumptions of a phenomenological approach, behavioral geneticists' findings on nonshared environment and by Lazarus' and Folkman's (1984) transactional perspective on stress and coping. This study had four purposes. The first was to describe and compare three different levels of influence on children's developmental context: individual child characteristics, dyadic influences, and family level influences. The individual characteristic was each child's illness appraisals, while dyadic and family level influences were represented by sibling relationship quality and maternal differential treatment, respectively. The second goal was to examine the direct associations among these influences and social emotional adjustment. The third aim was to examine the effect of illness burden and maternal differential treatment on each child's perceptions of sibling relationship quality. The final goal was to examine the influence of these two variables and sibling relationship quality on each child's social-emotional adjustment. Families were recruited through a clinic in Southern Arizona by mail and were sent questionnaires to complete if they expressed interest. For the present study, mothers provided demographic information, and information on objective illness burdens and each child's behavioral adjustment. Children provided illness appraisals and information about their sibling relationships and social emotional adjustment. Children's illness appraisals, perceptions of sibling relationship quality, maternal differential treatment, and social emotional adjustment were remarkably similar to each other. Maternal differential treatment, illness appraisals, and objective illness burdens accounted for significant portions of the variance in siblings' perceptions of sibling relationship quality, but not in the perceptions of children with illnesses. A significant regression equation for social emotional adjustment was obtained for siblings. A significant beta weight indicated that conflict was associated with more negative outcomes.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Developmental.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and Consumer Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGamble, Wendy C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9720621en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b3454298xen_US
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