Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290666
Title:
A system for constructing configurable high-level protocols
Author:
Bhatti, Nina Trappe
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Distributed applications often require sophisticated communication services such as multicast, membership, group RPC (GRPC), transactions, or support for mobility. These services form a large portion of the supporting software for distributed applications, yet the specific requirements of the service vary from application to application. Constructing communication services that are useful for multiple diverse applications while still being manageable and efficient is a major challenge. This dissertation focuses on improving the construction of complex communication services. The contributions of the dissertation are a new model for the construction of such services and the design and implementation of a supporting network subsystem. In this model, a communication service is decomposed into distinct micro-protocols, each implementing a specific semantic property. Micro-protocols have well-defined interfaces that use events to coordinate actions and communicate state changes, which results in a highly modular and configurable implementation. This model augments, rather than replaces, the conventional hierarchical protocol model. In this implementation, a conventional x-kernel protocol is replaced with a composite protocol in which micro-protocol objects are linked with a standard runtime system that externally presents the standard x-kernel interface. Internally, the runtime system provides common message services, enforces a uniform inter-face between micro-protocols, detects and generates events, and synchronously or asynchronously executes event handlers. The viability of the approach is demonstrated by performance tests for several different configurations of a suite of micro-protocols for a group RPC service. The micro-protocols in this suite implement multiple semantic properties of procedure call termination, message ordering, reliability, collation of responses, call semantics, membership, and failure. The tests were conducted while running within the x-kernel as a user level task on the Mach operating system. Additional micro-protocols for mobile computing applications validate the generality of the model. We designed micro-protocols for quality of service (QoS), transmitting and renegotiating QoS parameters during handoffs, as well as for mobility management, covering cell detection, handoff, and disconnection. This suite of micro-protocols can be configured to accommodate a range of different service requirements or even to mimic existing mobile architectures such as those found in the Crosspoint, PARC TAB, InfoPad, or DataMan projects.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Computer Science.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Computer Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Schlichting, Richard D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA system for constructing configurable high-level protocolsen_US
dc.creatorBhatti, Nina Trappeen_US
dc.contributor.authorBhatti, Nina Trappeen_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractDistributed applications often require sophisticated communication services such as multicast, membership, group RPC (GRPC), transactions, or support for mobility. These services form a large portion of the supporting software for distributed applications, yet the specific requirements of the service vary from application to application. Constructing communication services that are useful for multiple diverse applications while still being manageable and efficient is a major challenge. This dissertation focuses on improving the construction of complex communication services. The contributions of the dissertation are a new model for the construction of such services and the design and implementation of a supporting network subsystem. In this model, a communication service is decomposed into distinct micro-protocols, each implementing a specific semantic property. Micro-protocols have well-defined interfaces that use events to coordinate actions and communicate state changes, which results in a highly modular and configurable implementation. This model augments, rather than replaces, the conventional hierarchical protocol model. In this implementation, a conventional x-kernel protocol is replaced with a composite protocol in which micro-protocol objects are linked with a standard runtime system that externally presents the standard x-kernel interface. Internally, the runtime system provides common message services, enforces a uniform inter-face between micro-protocols, detects and generates events, and synchronously or asynchronously executes event handlers. The viability of the approach is demonstrated by performance tests for several different configurations of a suite of micro-protocols for a group RPC service. The micro-protocols in this suite implement multiple semantic properties of procedure call termination, message ordering, reliability, collation of responses, call semantics, membership, and failure. The tests were conducted while running within the x-kernel as a user level task on the Mach operating system. Additional micro-protocols for mobile computing applications validate the generality of the model. We designed micro-protocols for quality of service (QoS), transmitting and renegotiating QoS parameters during handoffs, as well as for mobility management, covering cell detection, handoff, and disconnection. This suite of micro-protocols can be configured to accommodate a range of different service requirements or even to mimic existing mobile architectures such as those found in the Crosspoint, PARC TAB, InfoPad, or DataMan projects.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectComputer Science.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineComputer Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSchlichting, Richard D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9720618en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34542930en_US
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