Relationship of self-efficacy, causal attribution, and emotions to female college students' academic self-evaluation

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290661
Title:
Relationship of self-efficacy, causal attribution, and emotions to female college students' academic self-evaluation
Author:
Almegta, Nadia Rashed, 1965-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this study the relationship between self-efficacy, self-evaluation, causal attribution and emotions of 300 female students at the United Arab Emirates University is explored. The congruence between teacher evaluation of students and students' evaluation of their own performance in the past, present, and the future is investigated. Students completed the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) and the Self-Efficacy and Attribution of Academic Self-Evaluation Questionnaire (SEAASE-Q). Results of the study indicated significant correlations between the variables. Analysis of variance revealed no differences between teacher evaluation of students and students' evaluation of their own academic performance in the past. However, significant differences were found between teacher evaluation of students and students' evaluation of academic performance in the present and the future. Also, significant differences were found between low, moderate, and high self-efficacious students in self-evaluation ability and their evaluation of assignments and predicted final grade for the course. Seventeen strategies of academic self-evaluation were reported in the interview. The consistency of students' feeling about their academic self-evaluation is discussed. Implications for self-efficacy, self-evaluation, causal attribution and emotion are discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Women's Studies.; Education, Educational Psychology.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Educational Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
McCaslin, Mary

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleRelationship of self-efficacy, causal attribution, and emotions to female college students' academic self-evaluationen_US
dc.creatorAlmegta, Nadia Rashed, 1965-en_US
dc.contributor.authorAlmegta, Nadia Rashed, 1965-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this study the relationship between self-efficacy, self-evaluation, causal attribution and emotions of 300 female students at the United Arab Emirates University is explored. The congruence between teacher evaluation of students and students' evaluation of their own performance in the past, present, and the future is investigated. Students completed the Motivated Strategies for Learning Questionnaire (MSLQ) and the Self-Efficacy and Attribution of Academic Self-Evaluation Questionnaire (SEAASE-Q). Results of the study indicated significant correlations between the variables. Analysis of variance revealed no differences between teacher evaluation of students and students' evaluation of their own academic performance in the past. However, significant differences were found between teacher evaluation of students and students' evaluation of academic performance in the present and the future. Also, significant differences were found between low, moderate, and high self-efficacious students in self-evaluation ability and their evaluation of assignments and predicted final grade for the course. Seventeen strategies of academic self-evaluation were reported in the interview. The consistency of students' feeling about their academic self-evaluation is discussed. Implications for self-efficacy, self-evaluation, causal attribution and emotion are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Educational Psychology.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMcCaslin, Maryen_US
dc.identifier.proquest9720596en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34524836en_US
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