Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290660
Title:
Aggressiveness in privacy-seeking behavior
Author:
Buslig, Aileen Laura Suzanne, 1966-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Almost everyone experiences the desire for privacy occasionally. Achieving privacy, on the other hand, can be more difficult, especially when relational concerns are present. While the topic of privacy has received a good deal of attention in a variety of fields (e.g., communication, law, psychology, architecture, sociology), the impact of the act of seeking privacy has received little study. Privacy-seeking is often considered a selfish act, one that is likely to make the seeker feel guilty and the other affected parties rejected. The purpose of the present study is to examine the aggressiveness of various strategies that people use to gain privacy. In the present study, privacy-seekers described how they tried to achieve privacy in a particular situation, the reasons and motivations behind their actions, their perceptions of the situation and their own behavior, and the consequences of their actions. Results indicated that the use of moderate aggressiveness may be a superior strategy for achieving privacy with relational sensitivity, in comparison to aggressive or nonaggressive strategies. Aggressive strategies were seen as more dominant, less pleasant and less composed, and resulted in more negative relational consequences, than moderately aggressive strategies, while nonaggressive strategies were seen as less dominant, equally pleasant and composed, but less satisfying to use than moderately aggressive strategies. The relationship of the intruder (friend or stranger) also played a role in how participants sought privacy. However, no setting effects were found for perceptions of the environment or type of territory and use of aggressiveness.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Social.; Speech Communication.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Burgoon, Judee K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAggressiveness in privacy-seeking behavioren_US
dc.creatorBuslig, Aileen Laura Suzanne, 1966-en_US
dc.contributor.authorBuslig, Aileen Laura Suzanne, 1966-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAlmost everyone experiences the desire for privacy occasionally. Achieving privacy, on the other hand, can be more difficult, especially when relational concerns are present. While the topic of privacy has received a good deal of attention in a variety of fields (e.g., communication, law, psychology, architecture, sociology), the impact of the act of seeking privacy has received little study. Privacy-seeking is often considered a selfish act, one that is likely to make the seeker feel guilty and the other affected parties rejected. The purpose of the present study is to examine the aggressiveness of various strategies that people use to gain privacy. In the present study, privacy-seekers described how they tried to achieve privacy in a particular situation, the reasons and motivations behind their actions, their perceptions of the situation and their own behavior, and the consequences of their actions. Results indicated that the use of moderate aggressiveness may be a superior strategy for achieving privacy with relational sensitivity, in comparison to aggressive or nonaggressive strategies. Aggressive strategies were seen as more dominant, less pleasant and less composed, and resulted in more negative relational consequences, than moderately aggressive strategies, while nonaggressive strategies were seen as less dominant, equally pleasant and composed, but less satisfying to use than moderately aggressive strategies. The relationship of the intruder (friend or stranger) also played a role in how participants sought privacy. However, no setting effects were found for perceptions of the environment or type of territory and use of aggressiveness.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectSpeech Communication.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBurgoon, Judee K.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9720593en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34521392en_US
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