An investigation of the relationships between undergraduate music education students' early field experience and student teaching performance

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290634
Title:
An investigation of the relationships between undergraduate music education students' early field experience and student teaching performance
Author:
Fant, Gregory Robert, 1960-
Issue Date:
1996
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This correlational study examined the relationships between undergraduate music education students' early field experiences and student teaching performance. Subjects were 40 music student teachers from eleven universities. Student teaching performance was determined from video samples using two teacher effectiveness forms, the Rehearsal Effectiveness Scale and the Survey of Teaching Effectiveness. Two independent judges were used and interjudge reliability was found to be .73 on the Survey of Teaching Effectiveness and .69 on the Rehearsal Effectiveness Scale. Reliability between forms is .88. Subjects were interviewed to collect data on both curricular and non-curricular undergraduate field experiences. These data were correlated with each subject's score on the teacher effectiveness forms. No significant correlations were found between total early field experience and student teaching performance. Significant correlations were found between early field experiences with feedback and student teaching performance (r = .439 and .507; p < .01). A significant negative correlation was found between early field experiences without feedback and student teaching performance (r = -.316, p < .047). No significant correlations were found to exist between the non-curricular index and student teaching performance. Based on their average student teaching performance ranking, five subjects were identified as a subsample for closer analysis. Data on dieir backgrounds, high school experiences, curricular experiences, and non-curricular experiences is presented. Conclusions include the following: 1. Early field experience widi feedback and peer microteaching are positively related to student teaching performance. 2. Early field experience regardless of feedback, non-curricular experience, degree type and student background are not related to student teaching performance. 3. Early field experience without feedback has a negative relationship with student teaching performance. 4. A methods/conducting lab is an effective setting for microteaching experiences. Implications for education and future research are presented.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Music.; Education, Teacher Training.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Music and Dance
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Cutietta, Robert A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleAn investigation of the relationships between undergraduate music education students' early field experience and student teaching performanceen_US
dc.creatorFant, Gregory Robert, 1960-en_US
dc.contributor.authorFant, Gregory Robert, 1960-en_US
dc.date.issued1996en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis correlational study examined the relationships between undergraduate music education students' early field experiences and student teaching performance. Subjects were 40 music student teachers from eleven universities. Student teaching performance was determined from video samples using two teacher effectiveness forms, the Rehearsal Effectiveness Scale and the Survey of Teaching Effectiveness. Two independent judges were used and interjudge reliability was found to be .73 on the Survey of Teaching Effectiveness and .69 on the Rehearsal Effectiveness Scale. Reliability between forms is .88. Subjects were interviewed to collect data on both curricular and non-curricular undergraduate field experiences. These data were correlated with each subject's score on the teacher effectiveness forms. No significant correlations were found between total early field experience and student teaching performance. Significant correlations were found between early field experiences with feedback and student teaching performance (r = .439 and .507; p < .01). A significant negative correlation was found between early field experiences without feedback and student teaching performance (r = -.316, p < .047). No significant correlations were found to exist between the non-curricular index and student teaching performance. Based on their average student teaching performance ranking, five subjects were identified as a subsample for closer analysis. Data on dieir backgrounds, high school experiences, curricular experiences, and non-curricular experiences is presented. Conclusions include the following: 1. Early field experience widi feedback and peer microteaching are positively related to student teaching performance. 2. Early field experience regardless of feedback, non-curricular experience, degree type and student background are not related to student teaching performance. 3. Early field experience without feedback has a negative relationship with student teaching performance. 4. A methods/conducting lab is an effective setting for microteaching experiences. Implications for education and future research are presented.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Music.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Teacher Training.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusic and Danceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCutietta, Robert A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest9713421en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b34417461en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.