Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290602
Title:
Small parties in Latin America
Author:
Moreno, Erika
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Empirical research on political parties has shed light on many aspects of party organization and behavior. Unfortunately, there is a great deal that we do not know about small parties, especially in presidential systems. I take a two-pronged approach to studying small parties in Latin America's presidential regimes. First, I examine the factors that impact the election of small parties across Latin America's democratic regimes from 1980 to 1998, accounting for both institutional and cultural factors. Next, I move toward an examination of the representation and governance roles that small parties play in three carefully selected presidential democracies: Chile, Colombia, and Venezuela. Since small parties are rarely studied, it is unclear what, if any, impact they have on the representativeness of the political system. Small parties may act as promoters of new policies which reside outside the boundaries of traditionally dominant parties. This may mean identifying with issues that are important to those sectors of society that have been ignored (e.g. minority rights) or representing new issues that cut across sectors of society (e.g. decentralization). Alternatively, they may promote mainstream issues, or they may have no substantive policy import (acting primarily as personalistic vehicles). With respect to governance roles, they may play an important supportive role in major party coalitions. Indeed, their coalition behavior may substantively impact the legitimacy of the system by supporting minority governments.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
History, Latin American.; Political Science, General.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Political Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Crisp, Brian F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSmall parties in Latin Americaen_US
dc.creatorMoreno, Erikaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMoreno, Erikaen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractEmpirical research on political parties has shed light on many aspects of party organization and behavior. Unfortunately, there is a great deal that we do not know about small parties, especially in presidential systems. I take a two-pronged approach to studying small parties in Latin America's presidential regimes. First, I examine the factors that impact the election of small parties across Latin America's democratic regimes from 1980 to 1998, accounting for both institutional and cultural factors. Next, I move toward an examination of the representation and governance roles that small parties play in three carefully selected presidential democracies: Chile, Colombia, and Venezuela. Since small parties are rarely studied, it is unclear what, if any, impact they have on the representativeness of the political system. Small parties may act as promoters of new policies which reside outside the boundaries of traditionally dominant parties. This may mean identifying with issues that are important to those sectors of society that have been ignored (e.g. minority rights) or representing new issues that cut across sectors of society (e.g. decentralization). Alternatively, they may promote mainstream issues, or they may have no substantive policy import (acting primarily as personalistic vehicles). With respect to governance roles, they may play an important supportive role in major party coalitions. Indeed, their coalition behavior may substantively impact the legitimacy of the system by supporting minority governments.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHistory, Latin American.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, General.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCrisp, Brian F.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3023510en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41957702en_US
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