COUNSELOR EFFECTIVENESS: RELATIONSHIP TO DEATH ANXIETY AND ATTITUDES TOWARD DISABLED PERSONS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290558
Title:
COUNSELOR EFFECTIVENESS: RELATIONSHIP TO DEATH ANXIETY AND ATTITUDES TOWARD DISABLED PERSONS
Author:
Fish, Dale Edward
Issue Date:
1981
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among death anxiety, attitudes toward disabled persons and counselor effectiveness. The subjects of this study were 50 masters degree students at The University of Arizona. All subjects were volunteers and were enrolled in the Rehabilitation Counseling graduate program. Additionally, they had all completed a five-week Human Resource Development Program. The subjects were individually administered the Death Anxiety Scale (DAS), the Attitudes toward Disabled Persons Scale (ATDP), Form B, and the 16 stimulus expressions from the Carkhuff Communication Index. The stimulus expressions were on audio tape and the subjects' responses were recorded for rating purposes. A t-test of means was used to search for differences between less effective counselor trainees and more effective counselor trainees in their levels of death anxiety and their attitudes toward disabled persons. The relationship among death anxiety, attitudes toward disabled persons and counselor effectiveness was investigated using the Pearson correlation coefficient. In general, the results of the study indicate that less effective counselor trainees do not significantly differ from more effective counselor trainees in either their levels of death anxiety or in their attitudes toward disabled persons. However, a significant negative correlation exists between counselor trainees' levels of death anxiety and their attitudes toward disabled persons. Therefore, counselor trainees with high levels of death anxiety viewed disabled persons as being dissimilar to able-bodied persons.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Counselors -- Attitudes.; Death -- Psychological aspects.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Rehabilitation
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleCOUNSELOR EFFECTIVENESS: RELATIONSHIP TO DEATH ANXIETY AND ATTITUDES TOWARD DISABLED PERSONSen_US
dc.creatorFish, Dale Edwarden_US
dc.contributor.authorFish, Dale Edwarden_US
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among death anxiety, attitudes toward disabled persons and counselor effectiveness. The subjects of this study were 50 masters degree students at The University of Arizona. All subjects were volunteers and were enrolled in the Rehabilitation Counseling graduate program. Additionally, they had all completed a five-week Human Resource Development Program. The subjects were individually administered the Death Anxiety Scale (DAS), the Attitudes toward Disabled Persons Scale (ATDP), Form B, and the 16 stimulus expressions from the Carkhuff Communication Index. The stimulus expressions were on audio tape and the subjects' responses were recorded for rating purposes. A t-test of means was used to search for differences between less effective counselor trainees and more effective counselor trainees in their levels of death anxiety and their attitudes toward disabled persons. The relationship among death anxiety, attitudes toward disabled persons and counselor effectiveness was investigated using the Pearson correlation coefficient. In general, the results of the study indicate that less effective counselor trainees do not significantly differ from more effective counselor trainees in either their levels of death anxiety or in their attitudes toward disabled persons. However, a significant negative correlation exists between counselor trainees' levels of death anxiety and their attitudes toward disabled persons. Therefore, counselor trainees with high levels of death anxiety viewed disabled persons as being dissimilar to able-bodied persons.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectCounselors -- Attitudes.en_US
dc.subjectDeath -- Psychological aspects.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8121927en_US
dc.identifier.oclc8698024en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b13910401en_US
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