ASSERTION TRAINING AND PHYSICALLY DISABLED SUBJECTS: EFFECTS UPON LOCUS OF CONTROL

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290555
Title:
ASSERTION TRAINING AND PHYSICALLY DISABLED SUBJECTS: EFFECTS UPON LOCUS OF CONTROL
Author:
Fordney, Susan Jane, 1945-
Issue Date:
1981
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The belief that an individual holds regarding his/her ability to control or influence the events of his/her life has been related to the adjustment of the physically disabled in the rehabilitation process. It is generally felt that those persons who assume that their actions make a difference, who have an internal locus of control orientation (I-LOC), are more successful in managing their disabilities and making the most out of their life situations. Assertion Training (AT) is a process which assists individuals in developing behaviors which enable them to express themselves directly without undue anxiety and to act in their own best interests while respecting the rights of others. Research indicates that AT is a useful therapeutic approach with a variety of populations but scant attention has been given to its effectiveness with physically disabled subjects although many of the variables considered to be critical in the rehabilitation process, such as self-concept and social interaction skills, have been shown to be positively affected by AT. The present study focused on the effects of Assertion Training on physically disabled subjects' locus of control (LOC) orientation. The dependent variables, LOC and assertiveness levels were measured by two questionnaires, Rotter's I-E Scale and the Rathus Assertiveness Schedule. A pretest-posttest control group design was used in this study. Physically disabled adults, aged 23 to 60, comprised the population. Thirty-two were randomly assigned to an experimental and a control group. Criterion measures were given to all subjects the week prior to and following the training. The experimental group received 15 hours of Assertion Training, consisting of 1 1/2 hour weekly sessions over a 10-week period. The training focused on increasing assertive behaviors utilizing a number of techniques, including role playing/behavioral rehearsal, modeling, coaching, and homework assignments. The following experimental hypotheses were tested: (H₁)Individuals given Assertion Training will show a significant difference in locus of control scores when compared to individuals who experience no special training. (H₂)Individuals given Assertion Training will show a significant difference in assertiveness scores when compared to individuals who experience no special training. (H₃)There will be a significant correlation between pretest assertiveness scores and pretest locus of control scores. (H₄)There will be a significant correlation between posttest assertiveness scores and posttest locus of control scores. Physically disabled subjects in the experimental group did not differ significantly at the .05 level of confidence in mean LOC or assertiveness scores from individuals in the control group. Internal-external locus of control and assertiveness were found to be significantly correlated. There does appear to be a significant relationship between increased assertiveness and a reduction in externality.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
People with disabilities -- Rehabilitation.; Assertiveness training.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Rehabilitation
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleASSERTION TRAINING AND PHYSICALLY DISABLED SUBJECTS: EFFECTS UPON LOCUS OF CONTROLen_US
dc.creatorFordney, Susan Jane, 1945-en_US
dc.contributor.authorFordney, Susan Jane, 1945-en_US
dc.date.issued1981en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe belief that an individual holds regarding his/her ability to control or influence the events of his/her life has been related to the adjustment of the physically disabled in the rehabilitation process. It is generally felt that those persons who assume that their actions make a difference, who have an internal locus of control orientation (I-LOC), are more successful in managing their disabilities and making the most out of their life situations. Assertion Training (AT) is a process which assists individuals in developing behaviors which enable them to express themselves directly without undue anxiety and to act in their own best interests while respecting the rights of others. Research indicates that AT is a useful therapeutic approach with a variety of populations but scant attention has been given to its effectiveness with physically disabled subjects although many of the variables considered to be critical in the rehabilitation process, such as self-concept and social interaction skills, have been shown to be positively affected by AT. The present study focused on the effects of Assertion Training on physically disabled subjects' locus of control (LOC) orientation. The dependent variables, LOC and assertiveness levels were measured by two questionnaires, Rotter's I-E Scale and the Rathus Assertiveness Schedule. A pretest-posttest control group design was used in this study. Physically disabled adults, aged 23 to 60, comprised the population. Thirty-two were randomly assigned to an experimental and a control group. Criterion measures were given to all subjects the week prior to and following the training. The experimental group received 15 hours of Assertion Training, consisting of 1 1/2 hour weekly sessions over a 10-week period. The training focused on increasing assertive behaviors utilizing a number of techniques, including role playing/behavioral rehearsal, modeling, coaching, and homework assignments. The following experimental hypotheses were tested: (H₁)Individuals given Assertion Training will show a significant difference in locus of control scores when compared to individuals who experience no special training. (H₂)Individuals given Assertion Training will show a significant difference in assertiveness scores when compared to individuals who experience no special training. (H₃)There will be a significant correlation between pretest assertiveness scores and pretest locus of control scores. (H₄)There will be a significant correlation between posttest assertiveness scores and posttest locus of control scores. Physically disabled subjects in the experimental group did not differ significantly at the .05 level of confidence in mean LOC or assertiveness scores from individuals in the control group. Internal-external locus of control and assertiveness were found to be significantly correlated. There does appear to be a significant relationship between increased assertiveness and a reduction in externality.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPeople with disabilities -- Rehabilitation.en_US
dc.subjectAssertiveness training.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRehabilitationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8120722en_US
dc.identifier.oclc7921814en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b23467241en_US
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