SPECIALIZED ACCREDITATION OF HOME ECONOMICS: HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT AND PRESENT STATUS

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290547
Title:
SPECIALIZED ACCREDITATION OF HOME ECONOMICS: HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT AND PRESENT STATUS
Author:
Mahrer, Linda Redmann
Issue Date:
1980
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Accreditation in home economics as done by the American Home Economics Association (AHEA) developed with, influenced, and was influenced by the development of home economics as a profession. The purpose of this study was to trace the historical development of home economics accreditation and to ascertain the current status of such accreditation. The research objectives included: (1) to identify the historical forces and events leading to the development of home economics accreditation; (2) to describe the current status of such accreditation, including current attitudes toward AHEA accreditation and demographic and change characteristics of AHEA accredited and non-accredited units; and (3) to identify possible future trends regarding home economics and accreditation. Historical data were obtained by the investigator through a review of published and unpublished materials and from interviews. Conclusions on the current status were based on data provided on a survey questionnaire by administrators of 215 home economics units. Data analysis provided descriptive and comparative data for each research question. Major findings of the study included the following: First, accreditation as a method to establish and maintain standards in undergraduate professional home economics developed primarily through the efforts of home economists in two associations--the AHEA and the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges (NASULGC). Second, in their attitudes toward AHEA accreditation, the greatest proportion of administrators view it as an advantage for their unit, especially in respect to standards of educational quality, unity of home economics as a field of study, status of home economics in the eyes of other professions, visibility of the unit, and importance to the field of home economics--factors voiced historically in relation to quality standards in home economics. Third, administrators feel that regional accreditation of the institution is not sufficient, and that specialized accreditation by such organizations as AHEA, the American Dietetic Association (ADA), and the Foundation for Interior Design Education Research (FIDER) adds benefits beyond regional accreditation. Though their costs are high, administrators report that they are worth the cost. Administrators recommend AHEA accreditation for public and private, large and small units. Fourth, a majority of administrators reporting changes over the past five years cited increases in such areas as number of majors and non-majors, number of graduates beginning graduate degree programs, and support from institution administrators. However, one-fourth of administrators reported a decrease in home economics enrollment. Fifth, desirable future trends, as reported by administrators, include AHEA accreditation of masters, specialist, and doctoral level programs; no increase in the number of accrediting agencies; and maintaining present agencies but increasing cooperative efforts in accreditation processes. Presently 50.2% of home economics units have multiple specialized accreditation. Sixth, self study is a major basis for accreditation and planning for improved education. Ninety per cent of AHEA accredited units and 60% of non-AHEA accredited units report having an ongoing program of self study. However, most administrators do not appear to see a direct relationship between accreditation and student competency levels. In home economics as in many professions accreditation has historically been important in the development of the profession. AHEA accreditation is likely to have a continuing and even increasing impact on the profession as more home economics units seek and obtain accredited status. This impact will be guided by those in positions of educational responsibility and authority--those who believe in the need for ongoing evaluation as a means to continually improving educational quality in home economics.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Home economics -- Study and teaching.; Accreditation (Education)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Higher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleSPECIALIZED ACCREDITATION OF HOME ECONOMICS: HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT AND PRESENT STATUSen_US
dc.creatorMahrer, Linda Redmannen_US
dc.contributor.authorMahrer, Linda Redmannen_US
dc.date.issued1980en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAccreditation in home economics as done by the American Home Economics Association (AHEA) developed with, influenced, and was influenced by the development of home economics as a profession. The purpose of this study was to trace the historical development of home economics accreditation and to ascertain the current status of such accreditation. The research objectives included: (1) to identify the historical forces and events leading to the development of home economics accreditation; (2) to describe the current status of such accreditation, including current attitudes toward AHEA accreditation and demographic and change characteristics of AHEA accredited and non-accredited units; and (3) to identify possible future trends regarding home economics and accreditation. Historical data were obtained by the investigator through a review of published and unpublished materials and from interviews. Conclusions on the current status were based on data provided on a survey questionnaire by administrators of 215 home economics units. Data analysis provided descriptive and comparative data for each research question. Major findings of the study included the following: First, accreditation as a method to establish and maintain standards in undergraduate professional home economics developed primarily through the efforts of home economists in two associations--the AHEA and the National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges (NASULGC). Second, in their attitudes toward AHEA accreditation, the greatest proportion of administrators view it as an advantage for their unit, especially in respect to standards of educational quality, unity of home economics as a field of study, status of home economics in the eyes of other professions, visibility of the unit, and importance to the field of home economics--factors voiced historically in relation to quality standards in home economics. Third, administrators feel that regional accreditation of the institution is not sufficient, and that specialized accreditation by such organizations as AHEA, the American Dietetic Association (ADA), and the Foundation for Interior Design Education Research (FIDER) adds benefits beyond regional accreditation. Though their costs are high, administrators report that they are worth the cost. Administrators recommend AHEA accreditation for public and private, large and small units. Fourth, a majority of administrators reporting changes over the past five years cited increases in such areas as number of majors and non-majors, number of graduates beginning graduate degree programs, and support from institution administrators. However, one-fourth of administrators reported a decrease in home economics enrollment. Fifth, desirable future trends, as reported by administrators, include AHEA accreditation of masters, specialist, and doctoral level programs; no increase in the number of accrediting agencies; and maintaining present agencies but increasing cooperative efforts in accreditation processes. Presently 50.2% of home economics units have multiple specialized accreditation. Sixth, self study is a major basis for accreditation and planning for improved education. Ninety per cent of AHEA accredited units and 60% of non-AHEA accredited units report having an ongoing program of self study. However, most administrators do not appear to see a direct relationship between accreditation and student competency levels. In home economics as in many professions accreditation has historically been important in the development of the profession. AHEA accreditation is likely to have a continuing and even increasing impact on the profession as more home economics units seek and obtain accredited status. This impact will be guided by those in positions of educational responsibility and authority--those who believe in the need for ongoing evaluation as a means to continually improving educational quality in home economics.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHome economics -- Study and teaching.en_US
dc.subjectAccreditation (Education)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8108324en_US
dc.identifier.oclc7951061en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b13605884en_US
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