TOWARD AN OBJECTIVE TEST OF MCCLELLAND'S PERSONALIZED POWER THESIS OF ALCOHOLISM

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290538
Title:
TOWARD AN OBJECTIVE TEST OF MCCLELLAND'S PERSONALIZED POWER THESIS OF ALCOHOLISM
Author:
Gingras, Terry James
Issue Date:
1980
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The present study involved the development of an objective paper-and-pencil measure of McClelland's personalized power theory of alcoholism. This theory proposes that alcoholics have a high personalized power need that they satisfy by drinking alcohol. Need for personalized power is characterized by a desire to prove oneself by defeating an opponent in one-to-one combat. Since they are unable to satisfy this need directly, alcoholics drink alcohol, the physiological and psychological effects of which are interpreted by the individual as strengthening, therefore satisfying the personalized power need. The study consisted of two phases. The first phase was designed to establish the applicability of the personalized power theory to alcoholics and developing a questionnaire to measure personalized power. The second phase was involved with cross-validating the instrument, establishing the reliability and comparing it with what is currently the most frequently utilized screening instrument for alcoholism. Alcoholic subjects came from the population in treatment at the Alcohol Treatment Unit of the Tucson, Arizona Veterans Administration Medical Center. The control group was composed of outpatients at the same facility. The results of Phase I indicate that alcoholics have high personalized power needs. In addition, an instrument was developed to measure personalized power. The instrument was developed using a composite approach from four already established instruments (the MacAndrews Alcoholism Scale, the Personal Reaction Inventory, the Machiavellianism IV Scale and the F Scale). In Phase II the instrument showed high reliability across a two week test-retest interval. Additionally, the instrument showed high concurrent validity, accurately categorizing 86% of the Phase II sample as alcoholic or control. There were significant differences between the sample's responses on this measure. The construct validity of the instrument was established primarily by the logic of its development and, to a lesser extent, by the method of internal consistency. The instrument, hereafter referred to as the Gingras-Kahn Inventory of Personalized Power (G-KIPP), compared very favorably with the most frequently used screening instrument, the MacAndrews Alcoholism Scale. The G-KIPP exceeded the MacAndrews on every measure and was more efficient at screening the alcoholics from the controls in the sample. The study also included a drinking pattern questionnaire. This questionnaire revealed that alcoholics suffered in more than one area because of their drinking. Most alcoholics reported suffering psychologically, physically, socially, economically and legally because of their drinking. The typical alcoholic had a 20-year history of drinking before realizing that he had a problem and then spent eight more years before seeking treatment. Alcoholics also liked different aspects of drinking than did controls. The controls liked the taste, the social aspects and the relaxation associated with drinking. Alcoholics were more likely to report liking the sensation of being inebriated and liked being able to forget as a result of drinking. The relationships of these findings to the theory of personalized power was discussed. These findings were discussed in relationship to the theory of personalized power and in relationship to the treatment program that is based on this theory. The advantages of theoretically-derived instruments were discussed compared to empirically-derived instruments.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Alcoholism -- Psychological aspects.; Personality assessment.; Power (Social sciences); Alcoholism.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleTOWARD AN OBJECTIVE TEST OF MCCLELLAND'S PERSONALIZED POWER THESIS OF ALCOHOLISMen_US
dc.creatorGingras, Terry Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.authorGingras, Terry Jamesen_US
dc.date.issued1980en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe present study involved the development of an objective paper-and-pencil measure of McClelland's personalized power theory of alcoholism. This theory proposes that alcoholics have a high personalized power need that they satisfy by drinking alcohol. Need for personalized power is characterized by a desire to prove oneself by defeating an opponent in one-to-one combat. Since they are unable to satisfy this need directly, alcoholics drink alcohol, the physiological and psychological effects of which are interpreted by the individual as strengthening, therefore satisfying the personalized power need. The study consisted of two phases. The first phase was designed to establish the applicability of the personalized power theory to alcoholics and developing a questionnaire to measure personalized power. The second phase was involved with cross-validating the instrument, establishing the reliability and comparing it with what is currently the most frequently utilized screening instrument for alcoholism. Alcoholic subjects came from the population in treatment at the Alcohol Treatment Unit of the Tucson, Arizona Veterans Administration Medical Center. The control group was composed of outpatients at the same facility. The results of Phase I indicate that alcoholics have high personalized power needs. In addition, an instrument was developed to measure personalized power. The instrument was developed using a composite approach from four already established instruments (the MacAndrews Alcoholism Scale, the Personal Reaction Inventory, the Machiavellianism IV Scale and the F Scale). In Phase II the instrument showed high reliability across a two week test-retest interval. Additionally, the instrument showed high concurrent validity, accurately categorizing 86% of the Phase II sample as alcoholic or control. There were significant differences between the sample's responses on this measure. The construct validity of the instrument was established primarily by the logic of its development and, to a lesser extent, by the method of internal consistency. The instrument, hereafter referred to as the Gingras-Kahn Inventory of Personalized Power (G-KIPP), compared very favorably with the most frequently used screening instrument, the MacAndrews Alcoholism Scale. The G-KIPP exceeded the MacAndrews on every measure and was more efficient at screening the alcoholics from the controls in the sample. The study also included a drinking pattern questionnaire. This questionnaire revealed that alcoholics suffered in more than one area because of their drinking. Most alcoholics reported suffering psychologically, physically, socially, economically and legally because of their drinking. The typical alcoholic had a 20-year history of drinking before realizing that he had a problem and then spent eight more years before seeking treatment. Alcoholics also liked different aspects of drinking than did controls. The controls liked the taste, the social aspects and the relaxation associated with drinking. Alcoholics were more likely to report liking the sensation of being inebriated and liked being able to forget as a result of drinking. The relationships of these findings to the theory of personalized power was discussed. These findings were discussed in relationship to the theory of personalized power and in relationship to the treatment program that is based on this theory. The advantages of theoretically-derived instruments were discussed compared to empirically-derived instruments.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAlcoholism -- Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectPersonality assessment.en_US
dc.subjectPower (Social sciences)en_US
dc.subjectAlcoholism.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8027747en_US
dc.identifier.oclc8681345en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b13903184en_US
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