The impact of microbial population dynamics on the transport and biodegradation of organic compounds

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290445
Title:
The impact of microbial population dynamics on the transport and biodegradation of organic compounds
Author:
Sandrin, Susannah Kathleen
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The impact of microbial population dynamics on the biodegradation and transport of organic compounds was evaluated in this study. At the laboratory-scale, results from miscible-displacement studies demonstrated that transport and biodegradation behavior in systems with increasing biologic diversity and population density variation was considerably more variable. Biokinetic parameters associated with biodegradation of the target compound were found to be considerably different in batch versus flow-through systems. While growth rates were always higher in the flow-through systems, the impacts on microbial lag and cell yield were opposite in different soils. In homogeneous sand, microbial lag was longer and column cell yields were larger than values reported under batch conditions. However, in more heterogeneous soils, microbial lag was shorter and column yields were smaller in the flow-through systems. This was determined in part using a one-dimensional contaminant transport and biodegradation model that incorporates the effects of microbial lag, inhibition, bacterial transport and nonuniform distribution of microbes, which was developed as a part of this study. In the second part of this study, a contaminant transport and biodegradation model incorporating linear biodegradation was applied to recovery data from small input pulses of biotracers at the field scale. One field site was low in oxygen and fairly homogeneous. The other had been subjected to a surfactant flush that enhanced oxygen concentrations, and thus microbial population densities, near the injection wells. Application of this model allowed for quantitative determination of the spatial distribution of microbial activity at the field sites.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Microbiology.; Environmental Sciences.; Engineering, Environmental.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Soil, Water and Environmental Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Brusseau, Mark L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe impact of microbial population dynamics on the transport and biodegradation of organic compoundsen_US
dc.creatorSandrin, Susannah Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorSandrin, Susannah Kathleenen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe impact of microbial population dynamics on the biodegradation and transport of organic compounds was evaluated in this study. At the laboratory-scale, results from miscible-displacement studies demonstrated that transport and biodegradation behavior in systems with increasing biologic diversity and population density variation was considerably more variable. Biokinetic parameters associated with biodegradation of the target compound were found to be considerably different in batch versus flow-through systems. While growth rates were always higher in the flow-through systems, the impacts on microbial lag and cell yield were opposite in different soils. In homogeneous sand, microbial lag was longer and column cell yields were larger than values reported under batch conditions. However, in more heterogeneous soils, microbial lag was shorter and column yields were smaller in the flow-through systems. This was determined in part using a one-dimensional contaminant transport and biodegradation model that incorporates the effects of microbial lag, inhibition, bacterial transport and nonuniform distribution of microbes, which was developed as a part of this study. In the second part of this study, a contaminant transport and biodegradation model incorporating linear biodegradation was applied to recovery data from small input pulses of biotracers at the field scale. One field site was low in oxygen and fairly homogeneous. The other had been subjected to a surfactant flush that enhanced oxygen concentrations, and thus microbial population densities, near the injection wells. Application of this model allowed for quantitative determination of the spatial distribution of microbial activity at the field sites.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Microbiology.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
dc.subjectEngineering, Environmental.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, Water and Environmental Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBrusseau, Mark L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3023491en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41957489en_US
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