The seduction of culture: Representation and self-fashioning in Anglo-American popular culture

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290379
Title:
The seduction of culture: Representation and self-fashioning in Anglo-American popular culture
Author:
Su, Genxing
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
One important means by which a society maintains and reproduces its dominant ideology is through cultural seductions. By creating in its viewers/readers a good feeling about themselves and the world they live in, popular culture entices individuals into approving of, supporting and embracing the dominant social, political and economic orders of our world. What Louis Althusser calls ideological "interpellation," therefore, is frequently a form of seduction involving the use of sweeteners that render certain values, beliefs and social positions enticing and attractive. Among such seducers are money, women (sexual pleasure), fear, an illusion of power and the semblance of dissent/rebelliousness, many of which are, or are generated by the representation of, the cultural and political "others" of the West. At the same time, the reproduction and maintenance of the dominant orders in the West, to which these "others" make no insignificant contributions, ultimately reinforce their subordinate and underprivileged statuses. Driving such illusion-based ideological seductions are capitalism and its colossal culture industry--a symbol of the postmodern convergence of the cultural, ideological and the economic--whose insatiable desire for profit casts the "others" of the West into the vicious circle of mis-representation and domination.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Literature, Comparative.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Cultural and Literary Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Babcock, Barbara A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe seduction of culture: Representation and self-fashioning in Anglo-American popular cultureen_US
dc.creatorSu, Genxingen_US
dc.contributor.authorSu, Genxingen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOne important means by which a society maintains and reproduces its dominant ideology is through cultural seductions. By creating in its viewers/readers a good feeling about themselves and the world they live in, popular culture entices individuals into approving of, supporting and embracing the dominant social, political and economic orders of our world. What Louis Althusser calls ideological "interpellation," therefore, is frequently a form of seduction involving the use of sweeteners that render certain values, beliefs and social positions enticing and attractive. Among such seducers are money, women (sexual pleasure), fear, an illusion of power and the semblance of dissent/rebelliousness, many of which are, or are generated by the representation of, the cultural and political "others" of the West. At the same time, the reproduction and maintenance of the dominant orders in the West, to which these "others" make no insignificant contributions, ultimately reinforce their subordinate and underprivileged statuses. Driving such illusion-based ideological seductions are capitalism and its colossal culture industry--a symbol of the postmodern convergence of the cultural, ideological and the economic--whose insatiable desire for profit casts the "others" of the West into the vicious circle of mis-representation and domination.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLiterature, Comparative.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCultural and Literary Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBabcock, Barbara A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3023482en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41957386en_US
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