A forgotten 'greater Ireland': The transatlantic development of Irish nationalism, 1848-1882

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290356
Title:
A forgotten 'greater Ireland': The transatlantic development of Irish nationalism, 1848-1882
Author:
Mulligan, Adrian Neil
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation explores the relationship between nationalism and globalization. Today, amidst increasing levels of global displacement and deterritorialization, nationalism not only remains the most important political force in the world, but is in fact experiencing a resurgence. Unfortunately however, the theorizing of nationalism remains largely incapable of explaining why this should be so. I argue that the problem lies in the fact that nationalism is both a historical and a geographical phenomenon, yet only the construction of nationalist temporal narratives has been problematized, whereas comparative analysis of nationalist spatial narratives remains scarce. This dissertation seeks to rectify this failing by focussing on extra-territorial dimensions of nationalism, and in particular the transatlantic development of Irish nationalism, 1848-1882. In this task, it draws on the Irish nationalist press and the personal correspondence of key political actors to illuminate the manner in which numerous narratives of Irish nationalism were forged out of a web of communication between the globally dispersed Irish diaspora. I argue that a number of creative extra-territorial interventions were made in the development of Irish nationalism; interventions since marginalized in the dominant narrative of Irish nationalism. Through an analysis of the transatlantic development of Irish nationalism in the nineteenth century, this dissertation locates a number of these marginal sites to reveal the underlying hybridity of the historical narrative, thus opening up the possibility for more spatially complex models of nationalist identity formation.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Geography.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Geography and Regional Development
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Marston, Sallie A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleA forgotten 'greater Ireland': The transatlantic development of Irish nationalism, 1848-1882en_US
dc.creatorMulligan, Adrian Neilen_US
dc.contributor.authorMulligan, Adrian Neilen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation explores the relationship between nationalism and globalization. Today, amidst increasing levels of global displacement and deterritorialization, nationalism not only remains the most important political force in the world, but is in fact experiencing a resurgence. Unfortunately however, the theorizing of nationalism remains largely incapable of explaining why this should be so. I argue that the problem lies in the fact that nationalism is both a historical and a geographical phenomenon, yet only the construction of nationalist temporal narratives has been problematized, whereas comparative analysis of nationalist spatial narratives remains scarce. This dissertation seeks to rectify this failing by focussing on extra-territorial dimensions of nationalism, and in particular the transatlantic development of Irish nationalism, 1848-1882. In this task, it draws on the Irish nationalist press and the personal correspondence of key political actors to illuminate the manner in which numerous narratives of Irish nationalism were forged out of a web of communication between the globally dispersed Irish diaspora. I argue that a number of creative extra-territorial interventions were made in the development of Irish nationalism; interventions since marginalized in the dominant narrative of Irish nationalism. Through an analysis of the transatlantic development of Irish nationalism in the nineteenth century, this dissertation locates a number of these marginal sites to reveal the underlying hybridity of the historical narrative, thus opening up the possibility for more spatially complex models of nationalist identity formation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectGeography.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeography and Regional Developmenten_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorMarston, Sallie A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3023477en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41957313en_US
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