The effects of message framing and message processing on cognitive and behavioral outcomes: An examination of breast self-examination messages

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290290
Title:
The effects of message framing and message processing on cognitive and behavioral outcomes: An examination of breast self-examination messages
Author:
Umphrey, Laura Ruth
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study examined the effects of message framing, message processing and issue involvement on breast self-examination attitudes and behaviors. A health frame message processing model was developed and tested in the context of a detection behavior based on prospect theory (Tversky & Kahneman, 1981) and the heuristic-systematic model (HSM) (Chaiken, 1980). Participants were exposed to either a gain frame message emphasizing the consequences of performing breast self-examinations or a loss frame message emphasizing the consequences of not performing breast self-examinations. Women who were classified as defensive processors displayed maladaptive responses in the form of minimization or denial of the health issue in a thought-listing task following exposure to the message stimuli. The results of the study indicated that (a) women with less self-efficacy engaged in maladaptive responses; (b) there were no framing-related differences in attitudes for high involvement women who processed the messages objectively; (c) high involvement women who engaged in defensive processing responded more negatively to the loss frame message than the gain frame message; (d) attitudes were significant predictors of behavioral intentions; (e) behavioral intentions were significant predictors of behaviors; and (f) low involvement women who received loss frame messages felt more susceptible to breast cancer than low involvement women who received gain frame messages. Limitations, suggestions for future research, and implications for health care professionals are discussed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Speech Communication.; Health Sciences, Public Health.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Communication
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Segrin, Chris; Dues, Michael

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe effects of message framing and message processing on cognitive and behavioral outcomes: An examination of breast self-examination messagesen_US
dc.creatorUmphrey, Laura Ruthen_US
dc.contributor.authorUmphrey, Laura Ruthen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study examined the effects of message framing, message processing and issue involvement on breast self-examination attitudes and behaviors. A health frame message processing model was developed and tested in the context of a detection behavior based on prospect theory (Tversky & Kahneman, 1981) and the heuristic-systematic model (HSM) (Chaiken, 1980). Participants were exposed to either a gain frame message emphasizing the consequences of performing breast self-examinations or a loss frame message emphasizing the consequences of not performing breast self-examinations. Women who were classified as defensive processors displayed maladaptive responses in the form of minimization or denial of the health issue in a thought-listing task following exposure to the message stimuli. The results of the study indicated that (a) women with less self-efficacy engaged in maladaptive responses; (b) there were no framing-related differences in attitudes for high involvement women who processed the messages objectively; (c) high involvement women who engaged in defensive processing responded more negatively to the loss frame message than the gain frame message; (d) attitudes were significant predictors of behavioral intentions; (e) behavioral intentions were significant predictors of behaviors; and (f) low involvement women who received loss frame messages felt more susceptible to breast cancer than low involvement women who received gain frame messages. Limitations, suggestions for future research, and implications for health care professionals are discussed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSpeech Communication.en_US
dc.subjectHealth Sciences, Public Health.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCommunicationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSegrin, Chrisen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDues, Michaelen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3016500en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41939293en_US
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