Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290279
Title:
The wedding day: A phenomenological exploration
Author:
Levin, Lauren Ann
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study described the meaning of the wedding day as experienced by brides who were planning their upcoming weddings. Topics that were addressed included: an investigation into the meaning of the wedding day as created by young women who were planning their wedding days; with a focus on the role of traditions and rituals in the creation of the meaning day; and an examination of how significant others were involved in the creation of the meaning behind the wedding day. Brides were recruited from a variety of sources, including students and attendants at a local bridal fair. Criteria for inclusion required that brides were young, heterosexual women between the ages of 21 and 30, were formally engaged to be married, had a specific wedding date set within 12 months, and had never been married. Fourteen brides participated in interviews. Giorgi's (1985, 1997) phenomenological procedure was used for data analysis. Findings revealed six essences that influenced the brides' created meaning of the wedding day. The six essential findings were labeled using concepts from symbolic interaction theory: symbols, role-taking, role-making, definition of self definition of the situation, and definition of other. Within each of the six essences, several themes emerged. Symbols were a predominant influence on the creation of the wedding day. Symbols were described when brides discussed the various traditions and rituals they were adopting, adapting, and avoiding as they planned their weddings. Brides went about role-taking and role-making in an effort to create their wedding days. Brides were guided in their role-taking and role-making through their use of wedding documents, such as bridal magazines. Brides' desired wedding days were also shaped around the definitions they carried of themselves and their definitions of the situation that they hoped to create on their wedding day. Several significant others were involved in the creation of the meaning of the wedding. Significant others were found to be both helpful and unhelpful to the brides. Overall, the meaning of the wedding day represented the influence of these six essences as the bride went about planning the wedding day she hoped to create.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Social.; Women's Studies.; Sociology, Individual and Family Studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Family and Consumer Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Cate, Rodney

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe wedding day: A phenomenological explorationen_US
dc.creatorLevin, Lauren Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorLevin, Lauren Annen_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study described the meaning of the wedding day as experienced by brides who were planning their upcoming weddings. Topics that were addressed included: an investigation into the meaning of the wedding day as created by young women who were planning their wedding days; with a focus on the role of traditions and rituals in the creation of the meaning day; and an examination of how significant others were involved in the creation of the meaning behind the wedding day. Brides were recruited from a variety of sources, including students and attendants at a local bridal fair. Criteria for inclusion required that brides were young, heterosexual women between the ages of 21 and 30, were formally engaged to be married, had a specific wedding date set within 12 months, and had never been married. Fourteen brides participated in interviews. Giorgi's (1985, 1997) phenomenological procedure was used for data analysis. Findings revealed six essences that influenced the brides' created meaning of the wedding day. The six essential findings were labeled using concepts from symbolic interaction theory: symbols, role-taking, role-making, definition of self definition of the situation, and definition of other. Within each of the six essences, several themes emerged. Symbols were a predominant influence on the creation of the wedding day. Symbols were described when brides discussed the various traditions and rituals they were adopting, adapting, and avoiding as they planned their weddings. Brides went about role-taking and role-making in an effort to create their wedding days. Brides were guided in their role-taking and role-making through their use of wedding documents, such as bridal magazines. Brides' desired wedding days were also shaped around the definitions they carried of themselves and their definitions of the situation that they hoped to create on their wedding day. Several significant others were involved in the creation of the meaning of the wedding. Significant others were found to be both helpful and unhelpful to the brides. Overall, the meaning of the wedding day represented the influence of these six essences as the bride went about planning the wedding day she hoped to create.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectWomen's Studies.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Individual and Family Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineFamily and Consumer Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorCate, Rodneyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3016498en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41939268en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.