Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290156
Title:
The evolution of pattern formation in butterfly wings
Author:
Reed, Robert Dale, Jr.
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this dissertation I employ a comparative gene expression approach to address the evolution of butterfly wing pattern formation at several levels, with emphasis on early pattern determination and pigment gene regulation during late development. Expression analysis of the receptor molecule Notch suggested previously unknown roles for Notch signaling in butterfly wing patterning. Notch upregulation was found to precede the activation of the transcription factor Distal-less during early eyespot color pattern determination. A phylogenetic comparison of expression time series from multiple moth and butterfly species suggested that changes in a Notch/Distal-less temporal pattern formation process were associated with the gain and loss of both eyespot and midline color patterns during wing pattern evolution. Additionally, Notch expression was found to occur in a grid-like pattern in the butterfly wing epithelium shortly after pupation. This observation, together with previous expression and simulation studies, support a Notch-mediated lateral inhibition model of wing scale organization. Tryptophan-derived ommochrome pigments are a derived feature of nymphalid butterfly wings. I found that multiple genes in the ommochrome biosynthetic pathway were expressed in the wings of selected nymphalid butterflies. Additionally, transcriptional regulation of genes encoding the ommochrome synthesis enzymes vermilion and cinnabar was found to be temporally and spatially associated with the polymorphism and development of forewing band patterns in the mimetic butterfly Heliconius erato. These findings provide evidence that changes in ommochrome gene regulation underlie the evolution and development of major nymphalid wing pattern elements.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Molecular.; Biology, Entomology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Molecular and Cellular Biology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nagy, Lisa M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe evolution of pattern formation in butterfly wingsen_US
dc.creatorReed, Robert Dale, Jr.en_US
dc.contributor.authorReed, Robert Dale, Jr.en_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation I employ a comparative gene expression approach to address the evolution of butterfly wing pattern formation at several levels, with emphasis on early pattern determination and pigment gene regulation during late development. Expression analysis of the receptor molecule Notch suggested previously unknown roles for Notch signaling in butterfly wing patterning. Notch upregulation was found to precede the activation of the transcription factor Distal-less during early eyespot color pattern determination. A phylogenetic comparison of expression time series from multiple moth and butterfly species suggested that changes in a Notch/Distal-less temporal pattern formation process were associated with the gain and loss of both eyespot and midline color patterns during wing pattern evolution. Additionally, Notch expression was found to occur in a grid-like pattern in the butterfly wing epithelium shortly after pupation. This observation, together with previous expression and simulation studies, support a Notch-mediated lateral inhibition model of wing scale organization. Tryptophan-derived ommochrome pigments are a derived feature of nymphalid butterfly wings. I found that multiple genes in the ommochrome biosynthetic pathway were expressed in the wings of selected nymphalid butterflies. Additionally, transcriptional regulation of genes encoding the ommochrome synthesis enzymes vermilion and cinnabar was found to be temporally and spatially associated with the polymorphism and development of forewing band patterns in the mimetic butterfly Heliconius erato. These findings provide evidence that changes in ommochrome gene regulation underlie the evolution and development of major nymphalid wing pattern elements.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Molecular.en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Entomology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMolecular and Cellular Biologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNagy, Lisa M.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3165791en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b47210618en_US
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