"In order that justice may be done": The legal struggle of the Turtle Mountain Chippewa, 1795-1905

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290149
Title:
"In order that justice may be done": The legal struggle of the Turtle Mountain Chippewa, 1795-1905
Author:
Shaw, John M.
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Throughout the nineteenth century, the prayers, addresses, memorials, legal briefs, testimony and delegations of the Turtle Mountain Chippewa exemplified Edward Said's insight that "nations themselves are narrations." Their legal struggle for land and sovereignty derived from "the power to narrate" their own side of the story. This tribal case study confirms that the Turtle Mountain Chippewa are a powerful people with a compelling history. An adherence to the Native viewpoint is required to re-examine the formulation and implementation of nineteenth century federal Indian policy. This more inclusive approach can help everyone gain a broader perspective on the history of European American/American Indian relations.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Cultural.; History, United States.; Sociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; History
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nichols, Roger L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.title"In order that justice may be done": The legal struggle of the Turtle Mountain Chippewa, 1795-1905en_US
dc.creatorShaw, John M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorShaw, John M.en_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThroughout the nineteenth century, the prayers, addresses, memorials, legal briefs, testimony and delegations of the Turtle Mountain Chippewa exemplified Edward Said's insight that "nations themselves are narrations." Their legal struggle for land and sovereignty derived from "the power to narrate" their own side of the story. This tribal case study confirms that the Turtle Mountain Chippewa are a powerful people with a compelling history. An adherence to the Native viewpoint is required to re-examine the formulation and implementation of nineteenth century federal Indian policy. This more inclusive approach can help everyone gain a broader perspective on the history of European American/American Indian relations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectHistory, United States.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Ethnic and Racial Studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHistoryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNichols, Roger L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3158155en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b48138265en_US
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