Development of the Drosophila nervous system: Roles for TGF-β signaling and the glypican Dally-like

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290147
Title:
Development of the Drosophila nervous system: Roles for TGF-β signaling and the glypican Dally-like
Author:
Rawson, Joel Michael
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Intercellular signaling is vital for the coordinated development of multicellular organisms. This is true for all tissue types including those that constitute the nervous system. The research described here explores the role of intercellular signaling in two vital steps of nervous system development, axon pathfinding and synapse maturation/modulation. The first chapter of this dissertation explores the role of the Transforming Growth Factor-Beta signaling pathway in the modulation of synaptic function and morphology at the Drosophila melanogaster neuromuscular junction. The second chapter explores the role of the glypican Dally-like in the process of axon outgrowth and axon guidance in the same organism. Glypicans are members of the heparan sulfate proteoglycan family of molecules and are required for the proper signal transduction of various intercellular pathways including TGF-beta. Therefore both of the projects that compose this research explore the important role of intercellular signaling in development of the nervous system.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Neuroscience.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Neuroscience
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Selleck, Scott B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDevelopment of the Drosophila nervous system: Roles for TGF-β signaling and the glypican Dally-likeen_US
dc.creatorRawson, Joel Michaelen_US
dc.contributor.authorRawson, Joel Michaelen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIntercellular signaling is vital for the coordinated development of multicellular organisms. This is true for all tissue types including those that constitute the nervous system. The research described here explores the role of intercellular signaling in two vital steps of nervous system development, axon pathfinding and synapse maturation/modulation. The first chapter of this dissertation explores the role of the Transforming Growth Factor-Beta signaling pathway in the modulation of synaptic function and morphology at the Drosophila melanogaster neuromuscular junction. The second chapter explores the role of the glypican Dally-like in the process of axon outgrowth and axon guidance in the same organism. Glypicans are members of the heparan sulfate proteoglycan family of molecules and are required for the proper signal transduction of various intercellular pathways including TGF-beta. Therefore both of the projects that compose this research explore the important role of intercellular signaling in development of the nervous system.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Neuroscience.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNeuroscienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSelleck, Scott B.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3158143en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b48138010en_US
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