Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290144
Title:
Gendered disjunctures: Globalization and human rights
Author:
Parisi, Laura Jean
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this dissertation, I attempt to improve upon previous studies of globalization and human rights by employing several strategies. First, I employ an interdisciplinary theoretical analysis that draws on disparate literatures from political science, economics, international law, and feminist studies. Second, I use a methodology known as multiple imputation to deal with missing data problems that have plagued previous studies. Third, I test for the differential effects of globalization, economic development, and democracy on the achievement of female and male socio-economic rights in order to understand the degree to which these variables affect the dependent variables of female and male infant mortality, life expectancy, literacy, primary school enrollment, and economic activity rates. Overall, the main findings in this dissertation shed light on inequities of men and women as empirical categories in the context of globalization, economic development and democratization. There are two main findings of this study: (1) There is a statistically significant difference between the achievement of socio-economic rights for women and men in the context of globalization; and, (2) The differential effects of globalization, economic development, and democratization on female and male socio-economic rights are varied but in general all three of these independent variables tend to have more positive effects on the achievement of women's socio-economic rights relative to men's.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Political Science, General.; Political Science, International Law and Relations.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Political Science
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dixon, William J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleGendered disjunctures: Globalization and human rightsen_US
dc.creatorParisi, Laura Jeanen_US
dc.contributor.authorParisi, Laura Jeanen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this dissertation, I attempt to improve upon previous studies of globalization and human rights by employing several strategies. First, I employ an interdisciplinary theoretical analysis that draws on disparate literatures from political science, economics, international law, and feminist studies. Second, I use a methodology known as multiple imputation to deal with missing data problems that have plagued previous studies. Third, I test for the differential effects of globalization, economic development, and democracy on the achievement of female and male socio-economic rights in order to understand the degree to which these variables affect the dependent variables of female and male infant mortality, life expectancy, literacy, primary school enrollment, and economic activity rates. Overall, the main findings in this dissertation shed light on inequities of men and women as empirical categories in the context of globalization, economic development and democratization. There are two main findings of this study: (1) There is a statistically significant difference between the achievement of socio-economic rights for women and men in the context of globalization; and, (2) The differential effects of globalization, economic development, and democratization on female and male socio-economic rights are varied but in general all three of these independent variables tend to have more positive effects on the achievement of women's socio-economic rights relative to men's.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, General.en_US
dc.subjectPolitical Science, International Law and Relations.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePolitical Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDixon, William J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3158133en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b48126949en_US
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