Student involvement in the natural resources public participation process

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290134
Title:
Student involvement in the natural resources public participation process
Author:
Bradley, Catherine M.
Issue Date:
2001
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Recent trends and research indicate a continuous decrease in civic involvement that impacts skills and abilities of individuals to participate in public decision-making in a meaningful way. Evidence indicates that student involvement in the public participation process can increase civic participation as adults. Gaps in the literature indicate a need to identify ways to increase student involvement in the public participation process, and to improve the process overall. Using a mail survey instrument, two groups in Arizona--planners and teachers grades 4 through 12--were queried to determine what methods are currently used to increase civic awareness and participation, and what each group needs to involve students more often in the public participation process. Survey results are compared between groups to understand compatibility of methods, and opportunities for planner/teacher partnership. Results indicate similarities in methods used but incompatibility regarding preference or frequency of use of methods. Both groups strongly agree there is student benefit from participation in the public planning process. They also agree that student involvement adds value to the planning process. Both groups' results suggest a need to learn more about how to involve students in the public participation process Two case studies are used to make a case for teacher-lead student involvement in the public participation process. Four goals from the environmental education field are modified and proposed, as an approach to structure effective student involvement.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Environmental Sciences.; Urban and Regional Planning.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Renewable Natural Resources
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Wilkin, Donovan C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleStudent involvement in the natural resources public participation processen_US
dc.creatorBradley, Catherine M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBradley, Catherine M.en_US
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRecent trends and research indicate a continuous decrease in civic involvement that impacts skills and abilities of individuals to participate in public decision-making in a meaningful way. Evidence indicates that student involvement in the public participation process can increase civic participation as adults. Gaps in the literature indicate a need to identify ways to increase student involvement in the public participation process, and to improve the process overall. Using a mail survey instrument, two groups in Arizona--planners and teachers grades 4 through 12--were queried to determine what methods are currently used to increase civic awareness and participation, and what each group needs to involve students more often in the public participation process. Survey results are compared between groups to understand compatibility of methods, and opportunities for planner/teacher partnership. Results indicate similarities in methods used but incompatibility regarding preference or frequency of use of methods. Both groups strongly agree there is student benefit from participation in the public planning process. They also agree that student involvement adds value to the planning process. Both groups' results suggest a need to learn more about how to involve students in the public participation process Two case studies are used to make a case for teacher-lead student involvement in the public participation process. Four goals from the environmental education field are modified and proposed, as an approach to structure effective student involvement.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental Sciences.en_US
dc.subjectUrban and Regional Planning.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWilkin, Donovan C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3016467en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b41890164en_US
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