Interactional accommodation and the construction of social roles among culturally diverse undergraduates

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290133
Title:
Interactional accommodation and the construction of social roles among culturally diverse undergraduates
Author:
Vickers, Caroline H.
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study explores the interactional achievement of intersubjectivity between native speakers (NS) and nonnative speakers (NNS) of English engaged in high stakes teamwork. I term the interactional achievement of intersubjectivity Interactional Accommodation. In particular, this study examines how strategies that NSs and NNSs employ to interactionally accommodate are related to language proficiency, successful team outcomes, and to the construction of team hierarchy. The context of the study is the team meeting associated with a design course in the department of electrical and computer engineering (ECE) at an American university, a setting in which NSs and NNSs work together on teams throughout the year to design operable electronic devices. Data was collected during one year from seven teams and a total of 27 participants through participant observation, video and audio taping of team meetings, and participant playback sessions. Data analysis incorporated an integrated approach informed by a variety of discourse analytic approaches. Findings demonstrate that the ability of teammates to interactionally accommodate to each other is correlated with the team's success. However, NSs and NNSs tend to employ strategies with different frequencies and in qualitatively distinct ways. These differences become important to the development of team hierarchy because strategies that NSs and NNSs employ tend to allow NSs control over the interpretive frame, which contributes to the construction of NSs as higher status team members than NNSs. The ability to control the interpretive frame is related to language proficiency, but in some cases NNSs develop strategies that allow them to control the interpretive frame and gain high status.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Bilingual and Multicultural.; Language, Linguistics.; Anthropology, Cultural.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Second Language Acquisition and Teaching
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Philips, Susan U.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleInteractional accommodation and the construction of social roles among culturally diverse undergraduatesen_US
dc.creatorVickers, Caroline H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVickers, Caroline H.en_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study explores the interactional achievement of intersubjectivity between native speakers (NS) and nonnative speakers (NNS) of English engaged in high stakes teamwork. I term the interactional achievement of intersubjectivity Interactional Accommodation. In particular, this study examines how strategies that NSs and NNSs employ to interactionally accommodate are related to language proficiency, successful team outcomes, and to the construction of team hierarchy. The context of the study is the team meeting associated with a design course in the department of electrical and computer engineering (ECE) at an American university, a setting in which NSs and NNSs work together on teams throughout the year to design operable electronic devices. Data was collected during one year from seven teams and a total of 27 participants through participant observation, video and audio taping of team meetings, and participant playback sessions. Data analysis incorporated an integrated approach informed by a variety of discourse analytic approaches. Findings demonstrate that the ability of teammates to interactionally accommodate to each other is correlated with the team's success. However, NSs and NNSs tend to employ strategies with different frequencies and in qualitatively distinct ways. These differences become important to the development of team hierarchy because strategies that NSs and NNSs employ tend to allow NSs control over the interpretive frame, which contributes to the construction of NSs as higher status team members than NNSs. The ability to control the interpretive frame is related to language proficiency, but in some cases NNSs develop strategies that allow them to control the interpretive frame and gain high status.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Bilingual and Multicultural.en_US
dc.subjectLanguage, Linguistics.en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Cultural.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSecond Language Acquisition and Teachingen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPhilips, Susan U.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3145144en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b47213085en_US
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