Making sense of literature through story: Young Latinas using stories as meaning-making devices during literature discussions

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290119
Title:
Making sense of literature through story: Young Latinas using stories as meaning-making devices during literature discussions
Author:
Lopez-Robertson, Julia M.
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This teacher research study examines the use of stories told by five second grade Latinas as a means to gain an understanding of their lives and the literature they were reading and discussing during small group literature discussions. The questions guiding the research are (1) what stories do these Spanish-speaking girls bring from their lives to literature discussions and (2) how do these girls use their stories to make sense of literature? The study is based on a qualitative research design and is also phenomenological in that I wanted to understand how the children created meaning from the books we read and discussed and how their individual experiences shaped their understandings. Although there were a total of seven literature discussions held during the time of the study, I decided to focus on two of the discussions. Included in the analysis are profiles of each the five girls in the study, case studies of both literature discussions and Narrative Intertextual Analysis (NIA) Maps. Findings indicate that sharing their life stories during literature discussions gave the girls an opportunity to deliberately scrutinize the emotionally charged events in their lives that they chose to share through story. The life stories the girls shared helped them understand the book we were reading and also allowed them to step away from their lives, if only briefly, and reflect on, think about, and see connections between the events in their lives so far; the girls used stories as meaning-making devices.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Language and Literature.; Education, Bilingual and Multicultural.; Education, Elementary.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Language, Reading and Culture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Short, Kathy G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleMaking sense of literature through story: Young Latinas using stories as meaning-making devices during literature discussionsen_US
dc.creatorLopez-Robertson, Julia M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLopez-Robertson, Julia M.en_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis teacher research study examines the use of stories told by five second grade Latinas as a means to gain an understanding of their lives and the literature they were reading and discussing during small group literature discussions. The questions guiding the research are (1) what stories do these Spanish-speaking girls bring from their lives to literature discussions and (2) how do these girls use their stories to make sense of literature? The study is based on a qualitative research design and is also phenomenological in that I wanted to understand how the children created meaning from the books we read and discussed and how their individual experiences shaped their understandings. Although there were a total of seven literature discussions held during the time of the study, I decided to focus on two of the discussions. Included in the analysis are profiles of each the five girls in the study, case studies of both literature discussions and Narrative Intertextual Analysis (NIA) Maps. Findings indicate that sharing their life stories during literature discussions gave the girls an opportunity to deliberately scrutinize the emotionally charged events in their lives that they chose to share through story. The life stories the girls shared helped them understand the book we were reading and also allowed them to step away from their lives, if only briefly, and reflect on, think about, and see connections between the events in their lives so far; the girls used stories as meaning-making devices.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Language and Literature.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Bilingual and Multicultural.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Elementary.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineLanguage, Reading and Cultureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorShort, Kathy G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3145092en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b47210400en_US
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