Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290111
Title:
The art and science of criminal profiling
Author:
Hicks, Scotia J.
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In recent years, the American public has become increasingly fascinated by criminal profiling. Despite the popularity of criminal profiling, however, evidence of its accuracy and utility in serving the various phases of the criminal justice process has not been scientifically demonstrated. Historically portrayed as an art, profiling has increasingly been represented as a science by profiling practitioners, even in the absence of a body of scientific literature to support such a representation. The purpose of this book is twofold: First, the state of criminal profiling today will be critically examined. This examination will include a discussion of the scientific and practical limits of existing approaches and the scientific and practice implications of these limitations for the field of profiling. Next, given the limits of the extant profiling models, this book will discuss the steps necessary for building a science of profiling. It is hoped that collectively these chapters will enable profiling to emerge as a credible and respected field that ultimately will significantly advance law enforcement investigations.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Psychology, Social.; Sociology, Criminology and Penology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Psychology
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sales, Bruce D.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe art and science of criminal profilingen_US
dc.creatorHicks, Scotia J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHicks, Scotia J.en_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, the American public has become increasingly fascinated by criminal profiling. Despite the popularity of criminal profiling, however, evidence of its accuracy and utility in serving the various phases of the criminal justice process has not been scientifically demonstrated. Historically portrayed as an art, profiling has increasingly been represented as a science by profiling practitioners, even in the absence of a body of scientific literature to support such a representation. The purpose of this book is twofold: First, the state of criminal profiling today will be critically examined. This examination will include a discussion of the scientific and practical limits of existing approaches and the scientific and practice implications of these limitations for the field of profiling. Next, given the limits of the extant profiling models, this book will discuss the steps necessary for building a science of profiling. It is hoped that collectively these chapters will enable profiling to emerge as a credible and respected field that ultimately will significantly advance law enforcement investigations.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPsychology, Social.en_US
dc.subjectSociology, Criminology and Penology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSales, Bruce D.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3145073en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b4721093xen_US
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