The effect of synchronous and asynchronous online communication on student achievement and perception of a music fundamentals course for undergraduate non-music majors

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290085
Title:
The effect of synchronous and asynchronous online communication on student achievement and perception of a music fundamentals course for undergraduate non-music majors
Author:
Sinclair, Diana Rebecca
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The rapid growth and popularity of computer technology, coupled with the exponential growth of the Internet, have made Internet communication tools an important area for research. Common Internet communication tools are synchronous real-time discussions where subjects log on to a chat room at a specific time, or asynchronous messages where subjects post and respond to questions to an electronic discussion board at their own convenience. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of online communication methods on written musical achievement and student perception of the learning environment. Subjects (N = 49) were undergraduate non-music majors, of mixed socio-economic background, enrolled in five sections of a music class at a large university. Treatment consisted of five weekly study sessions that addressed topics pertinent to the class, facilitated through online communication tools. Dependent measures were written musical achievement scores obtained through a researcher designed multiple choice test and student perception scores determined through the College and University Classroom Environment Inventory (CUCEI). The independent measures were group (synchronous or asynchronous) and situation (pre-post-test). Data were analyzed using a Two-Way MANOVA with repeated measures. No significant differences were found by group. Significant increases were found in written musical achievement scores but decreases on two sub-scales of the CUCEI scores (involvement and task orientation) from pre- to post- test situations. Thus, students enhanced their musical achievement during the five-week treatment period regardless of group. This finding supported those of researchers who have successfully used the Internet as an extension of the classroom learning environment. Further research is needed to examine how differences in the nature of synchronous and asynchronous interactions affect the unique musical learning environment. In music teacher education, the integration of Internet tools may encourage student interaction about a particular topic and provide a forum where students may articulate goals and principles. It may be possible to create a more individualized learning environment, which appeals to students with a variety of personalities and learning styles regardless of student maturity, or cultural background. Online communication tools may facilitate group collaboration, independent work habits and promote self-efficacy.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Music.; Education, Technology of.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Music and Dance
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Hamann, Donald L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe effect of synchronous and asynchronous online communication on student achievement and perception of a music fundamentals course for undergraduate non-music majorsen_US
dc.creatorSinclair, Diana Rebeccaen_US
dc.contributor.authorSinclair, Diana Rebeccaen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe rapid growth and popularity of computer technology, coupled with the exponential growth of the Internet, have made Internet communication tools an important area for research. Common Internet communication tools are synchronous real-time discussions where subjects log on to a chat room at a specific time, or asynchronous messages where subjects post and respond to questions to an electronic discussion board at their own convenience. The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of online communication methods on written musical achievement and student perception of the learning environment. Subjects (N = 49) were undergraduate non-music majors, of mixed socio-economic background, enrolled in five sections of a music class at a large university. Treatment consisted of five weekly study sessions that addressed topics pertinent to the class, facilitated through online communication tools. Dependent measures were written musical achievement scores obtained through a researcher designed multiple choice test and student perception scores determined through the College and University Classroom Environment Inventory (CUCEI). The independent measures were group (synchronous or asynchronous) and situation (pre-post-test). Data were analyzed using a Two-Way MANOVA with repeated measures. No significant differences were found by group. Significant increases were found in written musical achievement scores but decreases on two sub-scales of the CUCEI scores (involvement and task orientation) from pre- to post- test situations. Thus, students enhanced their musical achievement during the five-week treatment period regardless of group. This finding supported those of researchers who have successfully used the Internet as an extension of the classroom learning environment. Further research is needed to examine how differences in the nature of synchronous and asynchronous interactions affect the unique musical learning environment. In music teacher education, the integration of Internet tools may encourage student interaction about a particular topic and provide a forum where students may articulate goals and principles. It may be possible to create a more individualized learning environment, which appeals to students with a variety of personalities and learning styles regardless of student maturity, or cultural background. Online communication tools may facilitate group collaboration, independent work habits and promote self-efficacy.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Music.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Technology of.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMusic and Danceen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHamann, Donald L.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3132257en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b46711491en_US
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