Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290075
Title:
On the formation of fingerprints
Author:
Kuecken, Michael U.
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The fingerprint pattern (epidermal ridge pattern) becomes established at about the 10th to 16th week of pregnancy, when the lowest layer of the epidermis, the basal layer, becomes undulated. The pattern established by these undulations becomes visible on the skin surface in subsequent weeks of pregnancy. We argue that the undulation process is initiated by buckling of the basal layer. The necessary compressive stress is generated by differential growth. The instability is investigated using the classic von Karman equations for curved surfaces. The analysis reveals that ridges (rolls) are the most common pattern type and that the local ridge direction of the pattern is perpendicular to the direction of largest stress. For certain parameter regimes dot patterns (hexagons) are a stable solution of the equations. Such dot patterns are, in fact, observed on the palms of certain marsupials. The stress in the basal layer is induced by two mechanisms. First, the basal layer expands faster than the other skin structures. Such expansion is resisted at the major flexion creases and the nail furrow. Second, there is a change in fingertip geometry at the time of pattern generation that provides a different source of growth stress. The combination of the two processes predicts the correct sequence of pattern spread over the fingertip. It also explains the observation that fingerprint configurations are related to the fingertip geometry at the time of ridge formation. Computer simulations for the most important configurations exhibit many features of actual fingerprints and suggest directions for future work.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biology, Anatomy.; Biophysics, General.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Applied Mathematics
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Newell, Alan C.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleOn the formation of fingerprintsen_US
dc.creatorKuecken, Michael U.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKuecken, Michael U.en_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe fingerprint pattern (epidermal ridge pattern) becomes established at about the 10th to 16th week of pregnancy, when the lowest layer of the epidermis, the basal layer, becomes undulated. The pattern established by these undulations becomes visible on the skin surface in subsequent weeks of pregnancy. We argue that the undulation process is initiated by buckling of the basal layer. The necessary compressive stress is generated by differential growth. The instability is investigated using the classic von Karman equations for curved surfaces. The analysis reveals that ridges (rolls) are the most common pattern type and that the local ridge direction of the pattern is perpendicular to the direction of largest stress. For certain parameter regimes dot patterns (hexagons) are a stable solution of the equations. Such dot patterns are, in fact, observed on the palms of certain marsupials. The stress in the basal layer is induced by two mechanisms. First, the basal layer expands faster than the other skin structures. Such expansion is resisted at the major flexion creases and the nail furrow. Second, there is a change in fingertip geometry at the time of pattern generation that provides a different source of growth stress. The combination of the two processes predicts the correct sequence of pattern spread over the fingertip. It also explains the observation that fingerprint configurations are related to the fingertip geometry at the time of ridge formation. Computer simulations for the most important configurations exhibit many features of actual fingerprints and suggest directions for future work.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiology, Anatomy.en_US
dc.subjectBiophysics, General.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineApplied Mathematicsen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNewell, Alan C.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3132236en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b46708984en_US
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