Dancing with dragons: Social construction of technology during times of resource stress

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290071
Title:
Dancing with dragons: Social construction of technology during times of resource stress
Author:
Harris, La Verne Abe
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Today, struggles of higher education--technological change and organizational change--are like dragons--somewhat unpredictable, mystical, altering everyone and everything in its path. Managing technology and the restructuring of the organization is like dancing with dragons. Within the science and technology studies literature, scholars have developed sociotechnological perspectives that are useful for addressing the framing of technology during these fiscally-challenging times for universities. A close look at this literature reveals that Weibe Bijker and Robert J. Thomas have deemed technology worthy of sociological inquiry. These scholars believe that technical artifacts are not neutral, but constructed by older technologies, economic choice, politics, and social factors. This study examines social perceptions of technical artifacts during times of resource stress, specifically how it affects academic support technologists. It addresses the forces that drive and shape electrophotography processes and streaming media in an academic setting. I hope to contribute to the body of knowledge by evaluating electrophotography and streaming media as technical artifacts in higher education, identifying their adoption, implementation, and embeddedness in an organization. By exposing the deep relationship between a technical system and a social system, my intent is to create a link between the philosophy of technology as an intellectual construct and the social framing of a technical artifact.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education, Technology of.; Education, Higher.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Higher Education
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Rhoades, Gary

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleDancing with dragons: Social construction of technology during times of resource stressen_US
dc.creatorHarris, La Verne Abeen_US
dc.contributor.authorHarris, La Verne Abeen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractToday, struggles of higher education--technological change and organizational change--are like dragons--somewhat unpredictable, mystical, altering everyone and everything in its path. Managing technology and the restructuring of the organization is like dancing with dragons. Within the science and technology studies literature, scholars have developed sociotechnological perspectives that are useful for addressing the framing of technology during these fiscally-challenging times for universities. A close look at this literature reveals that Weibe Bijker and Robert J. Thomas have deemed technology worthy of sociological inquiry. These scholars believe that technical artifacts are not neutral, but constructed by older technologies, economic choice, politics, and social factors. This study examines social perceptions of technical artifacts during times of resource stress, specifically how it affects academic support technologists. It addresses the forces that drive and shape electrophotography processes and streaming media in an academic setting. I hope to contribute to the body of knowledge by evaluating electrophotography and streaming media as technical artifacts in higher education, identifying their adoption, implementation, and embeddedness in an organization. By exposing the deep relationship between a technical system and a social system, my intent is to create a link between the philosophy of technology as an intellectual construct and the social framing of a technical artifact.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Technology of.en_US
dc.subjectEducation, Higher.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorRhoades, Garyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3132225en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b46708753en_US
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