The economic organization of southern Canaan in the Late Bronze Age: A synthesis of the textual and archaeological data

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290060
Title:
The economic organization of southern Canaan in the Late Bronze Age: A synthesis of the textual and archaeological data
Author:
Cole, Lisa Marsio
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this dissertation is to consider a decentralized model, as opposed to the traditional centralized model, to explain the economic organization of the Late Bronze Age. The goals of this study are threefold: (1) to examine the internal economic organization of southern Canaan during the Late Bronze Age through a comparison of the textual and archaeological data and by comparison to neighboring cultures, (2) to examine and test the applicability of the "city-state" and the "dendritic-trade" model to Late Bronze Age southern Canaan, and (3) to suggest that a system of wealth finance, based on the distribution of imported pottery, was used to encourage villagers to participate in the trade networks. Chapter Two reviews the history of both social and economic theory pertaining to the Late Bronze Age in Syria-Palestine. Chapter Three describes the neighboring economic systems of Mycenaean Greece, Crete, Cyprus and Ugarit. Chapter Four is a database of all archaeological material used in this study. Chapter Five considers the relevant textual information. Chapter Six is a synthesis of the archaeological and textual material by which potential dendritic trade routes are modeled. Chapter Seven presents two case studies on Megiddo and Yavneh-Yam that provide further support for the Dendritic-Trade network Model.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Anthropology, Archaeology.; Economics, History.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Near Eastern Studies
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Dever, William G.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleThe economic organization of southern Canaan in the Late Bronze Age: A synthesis of the textual and archaeological dataen_US
dc.creatorCole, Lisa Marsioen_US
dc.contributor.authorCole, Lisa Marsioen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this dissertation is to consider a decentralized model, as opposed to the traditional centralized model, to explain the economic organization of the Late Bronze Age. The goals of this study are threefold: (1) to examine the internal economic organization of southern Canaan during the Late Bronze Age through a comparison of the textual and archaeological data and by comparison to neighboring cultures, (2) to examine and test the applicability of the "city-state" and the "dendritic-trade" model to Late Bronze Age southern Canaan, and (3) to suggest that a system of wealth finance, based on the distribution of imported pottery, was used to encourage villagers to participate in the trade networks. Chapter Two reviews the history of both social and economic theory pertaining to the Late Bronze Age in Syria-Palestine. Chapter Three describes the neighboring economic systems of Mycenaean Greece, Crete, Cyprus and Ugarit. Chapter Four is a database of all archaeological material used in this study. Chapter Five considers the relevant textual information. Chapter Six is a synthesis of the archaeological and textual material by which potential dendritic trade routes are modeled. Chapter Seven presents two case studies on Megiddo and Yavneh-Yam that provide further support for the Dendritic-Trade network Model.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectAnthropology, Archaeology.en_US
dc.subjectEconomics, History.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNear Eastern Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDever, William G.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3132208en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b46711296en_US
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