Constructing "The Land of Sunshine": Charles FletcherLummis and the marketing of a post-frontier West

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290051
Title:
Constructing "The Land of Sunshine": Charles FletcherLummis and the marketing of a post-frontier West
Author:
Staples, Joseph Perry
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation investigates Charles F. Lummis and his editorial influence, arguing that he contributed significantly to the literary and cultural construction of the American West. From 1895 to 1907, Lummis edited a Los Angeles magazine, The Land of Sunshine. Renamed Out West in 1902, the magazine served as a platform from which Lummis trumpeted his visions of the West and its literature, and helped launch various causes celebres , including restoration and preservation of Southern California's Spanish missions, establishment of a museum of the southwest, and agitation for Indian rights and education reform. I contextualize the decade of his influence within the rhetorics of realism and regional literature, both then prominent on the American literary scene, and within the emergence of mass culture at the beginning of the twentieth century. This dissertation contributes to American cultural studies because it is the first comprehensive analysis of Lummis's influence on the American literary tradition and his role in the cultural colonization of the West. Drawing upon previously unpublished material from the University of Arizona Special Collections, Colorado State University Archives, the Braun Research Library at the Southwest Museum, and the Sharlot Hall museum, it is also the first study to describe the extent of his intersections with artists, scholars, and historical figures at the turn of the twentieth century. These figures include Fred Harvey, Alex Harmer, Theodore Roosevelt, Charlotte Perkins Stetson (later Gilman), L. Maynard Dixon, Margaret Collier Graham, and many others.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Biography.; Business Administration, Marketing.; Literature, American.; Mass Communications.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; English
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Temple, Judy Nolte

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleConstructing "The Land of Sunshine": Charles FletcherLummis and the marketing of a post-frontier Westen_US
dc.creatorStaples, Joseph Perryen_US
dc.contributor.authorStaples, Joseph Perryen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation investigates Charles F. Lummis and his editorial influence, arguing that he contributed significantly to the literary and cultural construction of the American West. From 1895 to 1907, Lummis edited a Los Angeles magazine, The Land of Sunshine. Renamed Out West in 1902, the magazine served as a platform from which Lummis trumpeted his visions of the West and its literature, and helped launch various causes celebres , including restoration and preservation of Southern California's Spanish missions, establishment of a museum of the southwest, and agitation for Indian rights and education reform. I contextualize the decade of his influence within the rhetorics of realism and regional literature, both then prominent on the American literary scene, and within the emergence of mass culture at the beginning of the twentieth century. This dissertation contributes to American cultural studies because it is the first comprehensive analysis of Lummis's influence on the American literary tradition and his role in the cultural colonization of the West. Drawing upon previously unpublished material from the University of Arizona Special Collections, Colorado State University Archives, the Braun Research Library at the Southwest Museum, and the Sharlot Hall museum, it is also the first study to describe the extent of his intersections with artists, scholars, and historical figures at the turn of the twentieth century. These figures include Fred Harvey, Alex Harmer, Theodore Roosevelt, Charlotte Perkins Stetson (later Gilman), L. Maynard Dixon, Margaret Collier Graham, and many others.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectBiography.en_US
dc.subjectBusiness Administration, Marketing.en_US
dc.subjectLiterature, American.en_US
dc.subjectMass Communications.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEnglishen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorTemple, Judy Nolteen_US
dc.identifier.proquest3131643en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b46708492en_US
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