Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/290041
Title:
Water ice and radiation in the solar system
Author:
Mastrapa, Rachel Michelle Elizabeth
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Infrared detection of water ice phase can reveal the temperature and radiation history of a surface. In this dissertation, I will describe and quantify the process of amorphization of crystalline ice through lab experiments and computer simulations. I will then show how these measurements can be applied to ground based observations. The amorphous phase of solid water forms at temperatures less than 130 K, and converts to crystalline ice at 135 K in an exothermic and irreversible reaction. The amorphous and crystalline phases have distinctive spectra in the infrared. However, ion irradiation of crystalline water ice in the lab makes the infrared spectrum indistinguishable from that of amorphous ice. If the process of amorphization can be quantified, the model can be applied to various planetary surfaces, using an estimate of the temperature and the radiation environment. This work sheds light on the physical processes behind amorphization. I will show that the irradiation of crystalline ice does not create the amorphous phase of ice, but produces a sample that is spectrally indistinguishable from amorphous water ice. The changes in the spectral features are caused by the breaking of OH and hydrogen bonds among other processes. The temperature dependence of this process is a function of the ability of free hydrogen and oxygen to reform the crystalline lattice.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Physics, Astronomy and Astrophysics.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Planetary Sciences
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Brown, Robert H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.titleWater ice and radiation in the solar systemen_US
dc.creatorMastrapa, Rachel Michelle Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorMastrapa, Rachel Michelle Elizabethen_US
dc.date.issued2004en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractInfrared detection of water ice phase can reveal the temperature and radiation history of a surface. In this dissertation, I will describe and quantify the process of amorphization of crystalline ice through lab experiments and computer simulations. I will then show how these measurements can be applied to ground based observations. The amorphous phase of solid water forms at temperatures less than 130 K, and converts to crystalline ice at 135 K in an exothermic and irreversible reaction. The amorphous and crystalline phases have distinctive spectra in the infrared. However, ion irradiation of crystalline water ice in the lab makes the infrared spectrum indistinguishable from that of amorphous ice. If the process of amorphization can be quantified, the model can be applied to various planetary surfaces, using an estimate of the temperature and the radiation environment. This work sheds light on the physical processes behind amorphization. I will show that the irradiation of crystalline ice does not create the amorphous phase of ice, but produces a sample that is spectrally indistinguishable from amorphous water ice. The changes in the spectral features are caused by the breaking of OH and hydrogen bonds among other processes. The temperature dependence of this process is a function of the ability of free hydrogen and oxygen to reform the crystalline lattice.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPhysics, Astronomy and Astrophysics.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlanetary Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBrown, Robert H.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest3131621en_US
dc.identifier.bibrecord.b4670789xen_US
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